Libraries Promote New Form of Fiction Graphic Novels, Similar to Comic Books, Bring in Younger Readers, Say Suburban Librarians

By Sneller, Beth | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 16, 2002 | Go to article overview

Libraries Promote New Form of Fiction Graphic Novels, Similar to Comic Books, Bring in Younger Readers, Say Suburban Librarians


Sneller, Beth, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Beth Sneller Daily Herald Staff Writer

You may know "Road to Perdition," Tom Hanks' hit summer film, wasn't an original screenplay. You may even be aware it was based on some kind of comic book.

But unless you're a teenager or 20-something comics fanatic, you probably didn't know the dark mobster movie was adapted from a graphic novel.

And you probably have no idea what "graphic novel" means.

You're not alone. Even those who understand the form don't quite have the definition down.

Yet graphic novels are permeating the ranks of young adult readers and, in some circles, are more popular than comic books.

In addition, some area libraries are promoting the relatively new type of fiction for Teen Read Week, which began Sunday.

A graphic novel is a full-length book composed mostly of graphics and dialogue bubbles. Basically, it's a comic book in novel form, and often it's a series of comic books bound in a single volume.

"It's a very popular genre," said Kay Rinella, adult services supervisor for Naper Boulevard Library in Naperville. "These days, comics have sort of been marginalized, but graphic novels have filled that gap."

Graphic novels became prominent in the 1980s, when comic book companies such as DC and Marvel started binding their best series in book form.

It was a novel concept for comic book fans, who were used to getting their Superman or Batman fixes in monthly installments.

Libraries soon started adding comic book collections to their shelves because they were easier to deal with than flimsy magazines.

"A comic book can be so easily damaged," said John Robinson, co- owner of Graham Crackers Comics, a Chicago-area chain. "It's disposable entertainment. But a graphic novel has a spine and can be put on library shelves along with all the rest of the books."

Comic books and graphic novels are equally popular, Robinson said, but have different audiences. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Libraries Promote New Form of Fiction Graphic Novels, Similar to Comic Books, Bring in Younger Readers, Say Suburban Librarians
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.