New Nurses' Union

By Cimini, Michael H. | Monthly Labor Review, July 1990 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

New Nurses' Union


Cimini, Michael H., Monthly Labor Review


The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) recently announced the establishment of a new, national nurses union, the United Nurses of America, and an action plan that calls for "organizing the 75 percent of America's 2.2 million registered nurses (RN's) and licensed practical nurses (LPN's) who do not now enjoy collective bargaining" rights. The new union will be cochaired by Kathy Sackman, the current president of the United Nurses Association of California and an AFSCME International Vice-President, and Faye Krohn, also an AFSCME International VicePresident. Addressing the National Nurses Congress this year, Sackman said, "We are determined to give this Nation's working nurses a voice that nobody can ignore: not hospital managements, not professional and trade associations, not insurance companies, politicians, or anybody else. And we intend to use that voice to restore sanity to this Nation's health care system and restore fairness to the nursing profession."

The United Nurses' action plan calls for improving wages and working conditions of all nurses (RN's and LPN's); a national legislation agenda, including proposals for universal, quality health care, and the enactment of child care legislation and the Family and Medical Leave Act; elimination of discriminatory pay practices; the establishment of career ladders based on education, training, and longevity; and ensuring that health care providers have adequate staff to ameliorate the increasing injury rates at health care facilities. In addition to traditional collective bargaining objectives, the action plan calls for resolving the nurse shortage by improving nurses' pay to prevent wage compression, increasing wage differentials for undesirable or hazardous shifts, shifting nonnursing duties to ancillary personnel, lobbying the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to issue standards on blood-borne diseases, and instituting flexible work schedules and working conditions to encourage people to enter and remain in the health care industry.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

New Nurses' Union
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?