How to Date a Rock Artist

Science News, January 19, 1991 | Go to article overview

How to Date a Rock Artist


DA0045

Where the Pecos and Devils rivers meet the Rio Grande, ancient peoples with a penchant for painting took refuge in shelters dug into limestone cliffs. Pictographs of panthers, spear-throwing shamans and other figures cover some of these places from stem to stern and from floor to ceiling.

Determining the dates of pictographs helps scientists reconstruct vanished cultures. To obtain their date data, archaeologists and anthropologists traditionally have relied on indirect evidence, including radiocarbon dates of deposits on and near the art, as well as imagery in the paintings.

Direct radiocarbon dating of cave paintings has been mostly out of the question because of scientists' inability to distinguish the inorganic carbon in the limestone "canvas" from the paint's organic carbon, says chemist Marvin W Rowe of Texas A&M University in College Station. The organic carbon in ancient paints derives from blood, plant resin, juice or other binders," which, like modern oil- or water-based binders, carried pigments and adhered to surfaces.

Several years ago, Texas A&M anthropologist Harry J. Shafer met Rowe on campus and posed the question: is there any way to separate a sample's inorganic and organic carbon components to allow direct dating? In the Dec. 20/27, 1990 NATURE, Shafer and Rowe, along with chemists Marian Hyman and Jon Russ, describe a technique that seems up to the task.

The researchers tested their method on a thin, limestone-backed fragment of a pictograph that Shafer had found on the ground of a prehistoric shelter in southwest Texas. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How to Date a Rock Artist
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.