Culture: The Shape of Things to Come; Excellence in Architecture and Product Design Will Be Rewarded at This Year's BDI West Midlands Design Awards 2002. in the First of a Two-Part Series, Andrew Davies Looks at the Schemes Shortlisted for the Architecture and Environmental Design Categories

The Birmingham Post (England), October 29, 2002 | Go to article overview

Culture: The Shape of Things to Come; Excellence in Architecture and Product Design Will Be Rewarded at This Year's BDI West Midlands Design Awards 2002. in the First of a Two-Part Series, Andrew Davies Looks at the Schemes Shortlisted for the Architecture and Environmental Design Categories


Byline: Andrew Davies

Our built environment in the West Midlands is changing constantly. That much is obvious from a quick look out of almost any window in Birmingham's city centre.

While architects and planners are the first to admit mistakes were made in the past with projects such as the Bull Ring and the 'concrete collar' of the innercity Queensway ring road in the 1960s and 70s, the city, and indeed the region, has been transforming itself over the last few years. With schemes such as Centenary Square, Brindleyplace, the revamped Victoria Square and New Street and the Mailbox, the city now boasts a swatch of exemplarilydesigned buildings and urban planning schemes that have received national and international attention.

And this year more than 70 schemes have been put forward by almost as many architects for the BDI West Midlands Design Awards 2002.

Now, 24 schemes have been shortlisted from the 78 entries under the six categories: architecture; landscape; conservation; urban design; sustainability; and interiors.

The architects nominated range in size from small, one-man band practices to the design departments of property development companies and large national design corporations.

And the schemes themselves vary in size and scope from contemporary domestic extensions on listed buildings to sports club pavilions, art galleries and heritage centres, to schools and shopping centres, pavements and parks to cathedral grounds.

Awards administrator Richard Snell said Birmingham Design Initiative awards were set up more than ten years ago to raise the profile of the city and the region's architecture and environmental design.

'The organisation has been going for some time - the idea is to promote and lobby for the interests of excellence in environmental design,' says Snell. 'The BDI was set up by a group of architects, planners and property developers with the aim of promoting debate among the general public as well as among various government panels.' The built environment still plays the major part of the competition, despite product design categories being added into the biennial awards for the first time two years ago.

'The aim of the awards is firstly to promote the region - that's particularly true of the product design sections, which have received backing from Advantage West Midlands. Secondly, it's about raising people's awareness of what's going on and actually contributing to the environment and the debate about how it is changing for the better, and how it's changing with relation to social changes such as consideration of disability and sustainability, which is a category for the first time this year.

'What we've also tried to do in recent years is be less focused on Birmingham - in the last competition the New Art Gallery, Walsall was the building that won the top architecture prize.

'Advantage West Midlands encouraged us to look more widely as well, which has given us the problem of firstly having to go much further to visit all of the entrants, as most of them actually required us to go and visit them to get a sense of the materials, spaces and other aspects.

'I thought the standard of architecture was exceptionally high. The awards have become quite respected awards and people have begun to covet them as something they'd like to have on their shelves.'

The number of categories has grown, as has the number of entrants, says Snell. 'The interiors section was one area that had a limited entry last time, but this year it's been very good.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Culture: The Shape of Things to Come; Excellence in Architecture and Product Design Will Be Rewarded at This Year's BDI West Midlands Design Awards 2002. in the First of a Two-Part Series, Andrew Davies Looks at the Schemes Shortlisted for the Architecture and Environmental Design Categories
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.