Loren Shines at Italian gala.(LIFE)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 30, 2002 | Go to article overview

Loren Shines at Italian gala.(LIFE)


Byline: Sanjay Talwani, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Few people in the world have the star power to upstage a trio like Tony Bennett, Robert De Niro and Yogi Berra. Count on film goddess Sophia Loren to outshine them all - mere mortals - at the National Italian American Foundation's 27th-anniversary gala at the Hilton Washington and Towers Saturday night.

There was no point resisting.

"I'm going to make this quick. I love Sophia Loren," Mr. De Niro told the 3,000 guests before NIAF inducted them both into its recently created Italian American Hall of Fame.

Lesser celebrities milling near a temporary holding pen set up for the press stopped conversations to gawk when Miss Loren,68, entered in a flurry of flashbulbs and microphones, glowing in an orange Armani gown and towering above her escort, Motion Pictures Association President Jack Valenti.

Admirers clung so tightly that it took a few minutes for security to push her through the room, cutting short any attempts to talk above the din. Mr. De Niro hustled by for an even quicker visit in front of the cameras; most of his few words were lost as reporters shouted questions.

"Great culture, great food, great people. A great country. I love it," he said when asked about his forebears' ancestral land.

CNBC anchor Ron Insana, the evening's master of ceremonies, had no trouble summing up the honorees' exalted status: "We have a man tonight who, at one point in our lives, all Italian men wanted to be. And we got the woman who at one point in our lives all Italian men wanted to marry."

Guests, who had paid $350 per person or more to attend, uncorked their love when the celebrities finally were introduced from the dais. Entertainers clearly outranked public servants.

Mr. Berra earned a chant ("Yogi, Yogi, Yogi") from the crowd. Former professional wrestling champion Bruno Sammartino got a cheer that drowned out one received by Maryland Rep. Constance A. Morella, although that no doubt was because of the large percentage of out-of-towners in the room.

The crowd was so ecstatic that at one point, a speaker had to ask them to stop crowding the view of the guests at the top tables. It was all the Hilton staff could do to churn out the thousands of plates of somewhat cold pasta and veal chops. Nonetheless, the diners (with Italian in their blood or Italian in their hearts, as Washington Archbishop Theodore Cardinal McCarrick put it) were committed to having a good time - which wasn't too difficult when the entertainment included Mr. Bennett crooning "You Won't Believe Your Eyes" to Miss Loren.

When her turn finally came to speak, the actress reminded the group that the night was also about the experience, retold again and again throughout the evening, of Italians who sought America's promise and gifts, kept families close and in many ways lived their dreams through their children's and grandchildrens' successes.

"Italy has given the world some of its greatest treasures, and America remains a beacon of freedom and opportunity for the world," she said, noting that "NIAF preserves our common heritage and, most importantly, helps our children. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Loren Shines at Italian gala.(LIFE)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.