Bookshelf: Too Many Books Cross Our Desk to Review Them All. What Follows Is a List of New Books That Bear Noting

Conscience, Autumn 2002 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Bookshelf: Too Many Books Cross Our Desk to Review Them All. What Follows Is a List of New Books That Bear Noting


American Catholic Lay Groups and Transatlantic Social Reform in the Progressive Era by Deirdre M. Moloney. (University of North Carolina Press, 2002, 267 pp.)

Drawing on the activities of lay Catholic social reformers between 1880 to 1925, Moloney provides a keen analysis of the impact of class, gender and ethnic identity on the reformers' goals and accomplishments.

Catholic Social Teaching 1891-Present: A Historical, Theological, and Ethical Analysis by Charles E. Curran. (Georgetown University Press, 2002, 261 pp.)

Curran closely investigates the methodology and content of Catholic social teaching, beginning with Leo XIII's 1891 encyclical Rerum novarum and continuing through letters published by the US Catholic bishops in the 1980s. Using this historical approach, Curran identifies the prevailing trends, the logical disconnects, and the current shortcomings in Catholic social teachings.

Fierce Legions of Friends: A History of Human Rights Campaign and Campaigners by Linda Rabben. (Quixote Center, 2002, 251pp.)

Written by a human rights activist with Amnesty International, Fierce Legion of Friends traces the development of human rights campaigns involving millions of people around the world over the past two centuries. It recounts the stories of long forgotten campaigns and campaigners and surveys the development of the international human rights movement over the past 40 years.

Now is the Time---Women's Ordination Worldwide: First International Conference--Text and Context edited by Eamonn McCarthy. (BASIC, 2002, 112pp.)

This book contains the conference papers and resolutions from the first international Women's Ordination Worldwide onference held in Dublin, Ireland June 29-July 1, 2001, as well as an evaluation chapter and reflections from around the world about the conference. The book also contains a directory listing international organizations and contacts for the women's ordination movement.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bookshelf: Too Many Books Cross Our Desk to Review Them All. What Follows Is a List of New Books That Bear Noting
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.