Office Youth Culture Makes Men Try Botox

By Frith, Maxine | The Evening Standard (London, England), October 30, 2002 | Go to article overview

Office Youth Culture Makes Men Try Botox


Frith, Maxine, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: MAXINE FRITH

IT SEEMS there is an ever-increasing emphasis on youth culture in the workplace these days - and it's not just women who are feeling the pressure.

Apparently, men are also becoming anxious about worry lines, crow's feet and any other giveaway signs of advancing years that their bosses might spot.

With their jobs under threat, and the prospect of having to find another post looming - bankers, traders and other City workers are paying up to pound sterling400 a time for Botox injections to iron out wrinkles and worry lines.

One London clinic is claiming a huge increase in the number of high-earning men turning to Botox to help them hold on to their posts.

Louise Braham, development director of the Harley Medical Group chain of clinics, said its City branch now gives the face-freezing injections to up to 10 men a day.

" Last year, only around nine per cent of our Botox patients were men but now they account for around a third of our clients," she said. "It does seem to have something to do with market conditions-In the past year, there have been more and more redundancies, job losses and profit warnings. People feel under pressure but, when they are in front of their bosses or their rivals, they don't want to look as if they've got worry lines or are ageing.

"It's a competitive world and it seems youth counts. These people feel they need to look young and fresh and as if they can cope with a high-powered job. Botox can help with that."

The injections take only minutes to administer and - apart from the slight discomfort caused by having a toxin injected into the forehead - there are no immediate after-effects.

After a few days, patients are meant to see a smoother brow and fewer crow's feet or stress lines. The effect of a first injection lasts for around 12 weeks but subsequent courses are said to eliminate the signs of stress for up to five months. …

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