Saddam Should Sue Bill Clinton for Libel. Evil Dictators May Have Difficulty Proving Their Reputations Have Been Harmed, but at Least Clinton's Lies about Iraq Would Be Exposed

By Thomas, Mark | New Statesman (1996), October 14, 2002 | Go to article overview

Saddam Should Sue Bill Clinton for Libel. Evil Dictators May Have Difficulty Proving Their Reputations Have Been Harmed, but at Least Clinton's Lies about Iraq Would Be Exposed


Thomas, Mark, New Statesman (1996)


Bill Clinton was greeted with rapture at the Labour Party conference. As he walked on to the stage, delegates cheered in adulation, as if collectively saying: "Is that a cigar in your pocket or are you lust pleased to see me?" And the answer was: "Both."

Then Bill did what he does best, which is peddle half-baked half-truths, untruths and evasions thinly veiled as charisma. And the Labour Party conference did what it does best, which is pop its collective head under Bill's desk to show its appreciation.

In years to come, delegates will fondly recall the time Bill came to speak to them. Misty-eyed, they might even produce garments still waiting to be taken to the dry-cleaners, to prove it was him. What they won't recall is how they and the Great British Press left his lies unchallenged.

The most obvious was the "Saddam Hussein expelled the Unscom weapons inspectors from Iraq" lie. In fact, the US decided to bomb Iraq and told/advised Richard Butler, who led Unscom (the UN watchdog set up after the Gulf war to supervise the dismantling of Saddam's weapons of mass destruction), to withdraw Unscom before the allied bombing raids. Butler recounts the tale in his book Saddam Defiant.

As lies become accepted fact and the ex-president of the United States, the man who ordered the bombing, contradicts his own actions, the world becomes surreal. And the only way to fight surrealism is with surrealism! I therefore propose that Saddam Hussein sue Bill Clinton for libel and seek billions in damages. Obviously, evil murdering dictators are on dodgy ground when trying to prove that their reputations have been harmed, but it would be a start just to see these two where they belong -- in a courtroom.

The press must bear responsibility for allowing the constant drip-drip of Bush and Blair's propaganda to go by unchallenged. So far, the media's in-depth questioning of the pencilled-in war seems to run along the lines of: "Should we kill starving civilians with or without a new UN resolution?" Which brings the level of debate on mass murder down to the Pepsi challenge.

On 7 October, the Guardian reported that the US would keep Israel onside in the event of war by providing the Israelis with free Patriot missiles. If Saddam Hussein launched a Scud missile attack on Tel Aviv, the Patriots (anti-missile missiles) would shoot them from the sky. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Saddam Should Sue Bill Clinton for Libel. Evil Dictators May Have Difficulty Proving Their Reputations Have Been Harmed, but at Least Clinton's Lies about Iraq Would Be Exposed
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.