Awareness and Evaluation of Selected Marketing Journals Inside and outside the Discipline: An Empirical Study

By Ganesh, G. K.; Chandy, P. R. et al. | Akron Business and Economic Review, Winter 1990 | Go to article overview

Awareness and Evaluation of Selected Marketing Journals Inside and outside the Discipline: An Empirical Study


Ganesh, G. K., Chandy, P. R., Henderson, G. V., Akron Business and Economic Review


It has been reported that research productivity is a dominant criterion for promotion and tenure decisions involving business school faculty and marketing faculty in particular [2, 3]. Such productivity is typically measured in terms of publications in scholarly journals, publications in conference proceedings, and presentations at conferences. A farily substantial body of published research has emerged in the last ten years dealing with the entire arena of research and publications activity in the discipline of marketing. The criteria utilized to evaluate this body of published research can be broadly grouped together under these categories: How are various marketing journals ranked? Which marketing journals are most influential? Which individual articles in marketing have had the most impact? How do the editorial policies of the marketing journals compare? What type of articles form the content of marketing journals? Exhibit I catalogues individual articles under these categories. (The complete references for the citations in Exhibit I are in Appendix B.)

EXHIBIT I

CLASSIFICATION OF MARKETING ARTICLES DEALING

WITH RESEARCH AND PUBLICATIONS

Which schools' faculties are publishing most: In total and per capita basis? Clark and Hanna [13]; Clark and Kaminski [14]; Clark, Hancock, and Kaminski [17]; Clark [12]; Clark [11]; Cook [19]; Geistfeld and Key [22]; Henry and Burch [26]; Kurtz and Boone [27]; Marquardt and Murdock [30]; Milner, Norvell, and Andrus [33]; Moore and Taylor [34]; Robinson and Adler [37]; Wheatley and Wilson [41]

Which schools' graduates are publishing the most?

Robinson and Adler [37]; Wheatley and Wilson [41]

Which graduate programs are most highly regarded and what changes have occurred in such rankings over time?

Brooker and Shinoda [7]; Childers and Heckler [10]; Cook [19]; Grant [24]

How are the journals in this field ranked?

Beltramini, Schlacter, and Kelley [3]; Bertsch [4]; Browne and Becker [8, 9]; Coe and Weinstock [18]; Cook [19]; Fry, Walters, and Scheuermann [21]; Luke and Doke [29]; Parasuraman [36]; Vocino and Elliott [39, 40]

Articles in which journals are the most influential?

Clark and Kaminski [14]; Michman and Gross [32]; Parasuraman [36]; Vocino and Elliott [39, 40]

Which individual articles have had the most impact?

Clark and Kaminski [15]

Promotion, Tenure, Editorial Policies, Journal Proliferation, etc.

Bass [2]; Beltramini, Schlacter, and Kelley [3]; Broad [6]; Ferber [20]; Gerber and Hilger [23]; LaLonde [28]; Mason [31]; Shapiro [38]; Wooten, Stelert, and Ryan [42]

Content Analysis, Methodological Issues in Journals, and Other Topics

Albaum and Peterson [1]; Black and Gunnigle [5], Geistfeld and Key [22]; Grazer and Stiff [25]; Myers, Massey, and Greyser [35]

To the best of our knowledge, there has been no attempt to measure how active researchers in non-marketing areas of business administration view the marketing journals. In fact, very little is known about the awareness, let alone evaluation, of marketing journals. However, this awareness is important, since college and university level promotion and tenure committees are typically interdisciplinary. A marketing faculty member up for promotion and/or tenure typically assembles descriptions of accomplishments and recommendations in a file that proceeds through the department, college, and university level committees before a final decision is reached. Hence, a relevant issue is: how informed are business school faculty researchers outside the marketing area about marketing journals and what do they think of these journals? The research reported here sheds light on both of these issues.

DESCRIPTION OF THE SURVEY

Data for this research were collected through a mail survey of researchers who had published in "top" business journals. …

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