Jeb Bush Wins Race for Re-Election; McBride Campaign Falters in Florida.(NATION)(ELECTION 2002)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 6, 2002 | Go to article overview

Jeb Bush Wins Race for Re-Election; McBride Campaign Falters in Florida.(NATION)(ELECTION 2002)


Byline: Steve Miller, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

MIAMI - Gov. Jeb Bush handily defeated challenger Bill McBride yesterday, thwarting a concerted national Democratic effort to exact revenge for Election 2000.

Mr. Bush won by a comfortable margin of 57 percent to 43 percent, with 90 percent of precincts reporting.

The governor received a call of concession from Mr. McBride at 10:15 p.m., and walked onto the stage of the main ballroom of the Renaissance Hotel at 10:25 to the strains of Ricky Martin's "La Vida Loca" and the boom of a confetti cannon.

He was introduced by his father, former President George Bush, and before uttering a word, the governor approached the microphone and let out an exaggerated and animated exhale of relief.

In a five-minute speech, the governor promised a litany of good things for Florida - education, economic growth and family support.

Above all, Jeb Bush said, "we will protect limited government and individual freedom in ways that you can't even imagine.

"I will not let you down," he concluded, and ended his five-minute speech with a flurry of "thank you" greetings in Spanish.

Mr. McBride conceded with a public statement shortly after the race was called for his opponent at 9:35 p.m.

In a brief statement, a composed Mr. McBride said that his campaign has "moved the agenda to the right place. We've made a difference."

The broadcast of his concession was shown on the two large TV screens set up on each side of the stage at Bush party central.

When Mr. McBride began to thank the Florida's teachers union, which essentially ran and funded his campaign, the feed was abruptly cut off - to much Republican applause.

The race had appeared to be close until two weeks ago, when a disastrous final debate flipped the polls, some of which had been showing a dead heat.

Al Cardenas, chairman of the state Republican Party, said "never have the Democrats waged such a fight," referring to a concerted effort from the national party to unseat the governor.

Democrats hoped to take governorship as revenge for the 2000 election, when a victory in Florida put the governor's older brother, George W. Bush, in the White House after an acrimonious and partisan five-week legal battle amid ballot recounts. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Jeb Bush Wins Race for Re-Election; McBride Campaign Falters in Florida.(NATION)(ELECTION 2002)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.