Family China; Dining on Old-Time Values with Quality plates.(LIFE - HOME)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 6, 2002 | Go to article overview

Family China; Dining on Old-Time Values with Quality plates.(LIFE - HOME)


Byline: Jen Waters, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Formality is back in fashion, says Irv Losman, owner of Tiara Galleries and Gifts in Rockville. Mr. Losman, who sells Herend china, a sophisticated porcelain made in Hungary, says he has seen a growing interest in returning to simple values, such as eating dinner with family. As an outgrowth of this sentiment, he says people have been investing in sets of china as a way to stay close to home, especially during the recent tumultuous times.

"Something happens when you dress up a table and eat slowly," Mr. Losman says. "You keep your elbows down, and you're on your best behavior. You are focused and sitting up straight, recognizing the value of good conversation."

Although bone china and porcelain are considered the traditional forms of china, today "china" is generically used to refer to bone china, porcelain, earthenware and stoneware. Depending on individual tastes, consumers choose what best fits their needs. Each variety is made through slightly different methods and varies in value depending on its manufacturer, age and condition.

Joseph Diciacco, national marketing director of Carico International in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., says the most important information any first-time buyer of bone china or porcelain should know is that it is more than a monetary investment. It usually will be a family heirloom.

"It has a sentimental value," he says. "Each piece is almost like a work of art."

When customers buy bone china or porcelain, Mr. Diciacco says, they should consider choosing a simple pattern that will remain in vogue for many years. He says buying a simpler pattern is a safer route than spending money on the latest trend.

Some buyers may want to collect their set piece by piece, but Mr. Diciacco suggests buying all the components at once, or at least the basic items - companies may discontinue a line when it is least expected.

Closely inspecting prospective merchandise before buying it is also important, Mr. Diciacco says. If the pattern includes platinum or gold edges, make sure the metal rolls over the edges for a more luxurious look. Make sure the bottom rims of the coffee cups are smooth so that they will not scratch the saucer's design, and check for a consistency in the clay when studying the plates.

"Look for china free of blemishes, pimples, dimples and pockets of air," he says. "It's a higher perceived value."

Coordinating the china pattern with crystal is also a good idea, Mr. Diciacco says. A green or blue design can be complemented by the appropriate color of crystal, not simply a neutral tone, offering a more gracious table.

The elegance of bone china or porcelain is maintained through meticulous care, Mr. Diciacco says. Hand washing is the safest way to clean the items, and using a plastic basin to protect the pieces from chipping against metal sinks is a good idea. Overloading the sink with dishes will certainly cause damage, especially if they are left in the sink for a long period of time, he says.

Mild liquid detergents are the best choice. Abrasive cleaners should be avoided. If the dishwasher is used - and it is not recommended - use a detergent without lemon or other acidic agents. Sometimes, those products eat away the surface of the dishes. Also, make sure to hand rinse the items after using the dishwasher to remove all soap. Never allow the china to run through a high heat drying cycle; the items could break or crack from dryness.

***

Carico International specializes in porcelain, but Mr. Diciacco says its product competes with many manufacturers of the higher-quality bone china. Bone china, which has a similar mixture to porcelain china, is made primarily from china clay and calcified animal bone ash. The ash usually makes up from 25 percent to 50 percent of the total mixture and is added to the clay to give the china greater strength. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Family China; Dining on Old-Time Values with Quality plates.(LIFE - HOME)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.