A Human Manifesto

The Humanist, November-December 2002 | Go to article overview

A Human Manifesto


Human life on our planet is in jeopardy.

It is in jeopardy from war that could pulverize the human habitat.

It is in jeopardy from preparations for war that destroy or diminish the prospects of decent existence.

It is in jeopardy because of the denial of human rights.

It is in jeopardy because the air is being fouled and the waters and soil are being poisoned.

It is in jeopardy because of the uncontrolled increase in population.

If these dangers are to be removed and if human development is to be assured, we the peoples of this planet must accept obligations to each other and to the generations of human beings to come.

We have the obligation to free our world of war by creating an enduring basis for worldwide peace.

We have the obligation to safeguard the delicate balances of the natural environment and to develop the world's resources for the common good.

We have the obligation to place the human interest above the national interest and human sovereignty above national sovereignty.

We have the obligation to make human rights' the primary concern of society.

We have the obligation to create a world order in which man neither has to kill or be killed.

In order to carry out these obligations, we the people of this world assert our primary allegiance to each other in the family of man. We declare our individual citizenship in the world community and our support for a United Nations capable of governing our planet in the common human interest.

The world belongs to the people who inhabit it. We have the right to change it, shape it, nurture it.

Life in the universe is unimaginably rare. It must be protected, respected, cherished.

We pledge our energies and resources of spirit to the preservation of the human habitat and to the infinite possibilities of human betterment in our time.

 
Hafsat Abiola 
Founder, Kudirat Initiative for Democracy 
Nigeria 
 
Tadatoshi Akiba 
Mayor of Hiroshima 
Japan 
 
Tony Benn, M.P. 
English Parliamentarian 
United Kingdom 
 
Boutros Boutros-Ghali 
Former UN Secretary General 
Egypt 
 
Willie L. Brown Jr. 
Mayor, City and County of San Francisco 
United States 
 
Fritjof Capra 
Founding Director, Center for Ecoliteracy 
United States 
 
Ingvar Carlsson 
Former Prime Minister of Sweden 
Co-chair Commission on Global Governance 
Sweden 
 
Eugene Carroll Jr. 
Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy Retired 
United States 
 
Jimmy Carter 
President of the United States of America 
Nobel Laureate, Peace, 2002 
United States 
 
Sir Arthur C. Clarke 
Author 
Sri Lanka 
 
Mairead Corrigan McQuire 
Nobel Laureate, Peace, 1976 
Northern Ireland 
 
Walter Cronkite 
Journalist 
United States 
 
Mario Cuomo 
Former Governor of New York State 
United States 
 
His Holiness Tenzin Gyatso 
the 14th Dalai Lama 
Nobel Laureate, Peace, 1989 
India 
 
Marian Wright Edeiman 
Founder and President, Children's Defense Fund 
United States 
 
Paul Ehrlich 
Population and Environmental Scientist 
United States 
 
Richard R. Ernst 
Nobel Laureate, Chemistry, 1991 
Switzerland 
 
Adolfo Perez Esquivel 
Nobel Laureate, Peace, 1980 
Argentina 
 
Benjamin B. … 

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Human Manifesto
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.