Middle States African Studies Association (MSASA) and Other Black Organizations

By Evans, A. M.; Evans, V. | Education, Fall 2002 | Go to article overview

Middle States African Studies Association (MSASA) and Other Black Organizations


Evans, A. M., Evans, V., Education


Introduction

Most organizations are founded from a need to convene for a cause, be it professional, social, or community service. The Middle States African Studies Association (MSASA) was founded from a need to have a professional organization in the Middle States to address issues and concerns of Africa and African American professionals.

The MSASA

The Middle States African Studies Association (MSASA) was founded in the Department of History at West Virginia State College by Dr. Anna M. Evans, one of the writers, in October 2000. The MSASA was established as a professional association of institutions and individuals from the Middle Region of the United States, but not limited to, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, Indiana, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, and Pennsylvania. Many of the individuals have interests in various aspects of Africa, the issues surrounding people of Africa, cultures, and environments of Africa, and the history of the African Diaspora. The MSASA, as well as other organizations, provides avenues for the mentoring of junior and untenured faculty, intellectual stimulation on Africa and the African Diaspora issues, and support not always found on their campuses for research on and about Africa, African peoples, and other related matters. The Association is currently housed at West Virginia State College, Institutes, West Virginia, a historically Black college.

The officers of MSASA are as follows: Dr. Anna M. Evans, President; Dr. T. Ford Ahmed, Honorary President; Dr. Stuart McGehee, Vice President; Dr. Sonya Armstrong, Treasurer; Dr. Stephen Howard, Assistant Treasurer; Dr. James Natsis, Historian; Mrs. Phyllis Wolfe, Assistant Historian; and Dr. Khepra Khem, Parliamentarian. The Board of Directors of MSASA includes individuals from various institutions, such as Dr. Delores Taylor, West Virginia State College; Dr. Mark Orbe, Western Michigan University; Dr. Virden Evans, Tallahassee, Florida; Dr. Ronnie Wooten, Northern Illinois University; Dr. Carolyn M. Dejoie, University of Wisconsin, Retired; Dr. Charlene Byrd, National Center for Human Relations, Institute, West Virginia; and others.

The first convention of MSASA was held in Charleston, West Virginia, in March 2000. The Convention theme of "Shadow of Past Conferences" featured an exhibit of the Henrietta Marie slave ship presented for the first time to the Charleston community. Individuals from South Africa, England, the Middle States, and other places attended the historic convention. School children from many parts of West Virginia were bussed in to view the Henrietta Made Slave Ship exhibit.

The next two conventions were held May 3-5, 2001 and June 19-22, 2002, with themes of "Black Plaque: Health, Populations, and AIDS" and "The Global Legacy of Booker T. Washington" respectively. Individuals from the Middle States, Louisiana, Colorado, South Carolina, New York, several African countries, England, and others attended the conventions.

Other Black Organizations/Publications

The following is a listing of many organizations/publications founded by or for Black individuals:

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Middle States African Studies Association (MSASA) and Other Black Organizations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.