Hindley Death a Reminder of Horror

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), November 16, 2002 | Go to article overview

Hindley Death a Reminder of Horror


Byline: DAVID BARRETT, NICK ALLEN, VANESSA ALLEN BRIAN FARMER AND CHRIS MONCRIEFF

THE death of Moors murderer Myra Hindley sparked a torrent of reaction from victims' relatives and campaigners who had wanted her released.

Labour peer Lord Pendry, formerly Tom Pendry and ex-MP for Stalybridge and Hyde, has been concerned with the Moors murders, as a constituency issue, since he entered Parliament in 1970.

He said last night, ``Nobody rejoices in the death of anyone. I have been persuading every Home Secretary from the early 1970s to the present one that she should not be released, not least because she would not stand a chance of living if she got out.

``I represented the views of my former constituents in that regard. I know she became religious and was converted to Catholicism and sought her peace with her Maker, but at the same time we had to recognise that because of the horrendous nature of the crimes committed and the feelings of the relatives of the victims, she had to remain in prison.''

Lord Pendry added, ``I just hope that her soul rests in peace.'' Assistant general secretary of pro-bation union Napo, Harry Fletcher, said, ``The families of the Moors victims have suffered terribly over the years.

``However, the authorities believed that Myra Hindley did show remorse.

``Maybe we can now move to a situation where judges and the Parole Board make decisions about release, rather than the Home Secretary.''

Director of the Prison Reform Trust, Juliet Lyon, said, ``It's important to remember that Myra Hindley was only one of 23 people serving whole life tariffs.

``Currently there are nearly 73,000 people in prison and 100 of them will have killed themselves in the course of the year.

``Myra Hindley spent most of her life behind bars.

Many thought in her case that life should mean life. But there are others who believe in redemption and the capacity of even those who have committed terrible crimes to change and atone for what they have done.''

Peter Topping, a former investigating officer in the Hindley case, told Sky News, ``Had she not been involved in the way she was, this murder would not have taken place.

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