Unmentionable Vice Goes Mainstream: Homosexuality's Rapid Rise from Unmentionable Vice to Celebrated Minority Status Is Part of a Campaign to Subvert Judeo-Christian Culture. (Cover Story: Culture War)

By Grigg, William Norman | The New American, November 18, 2002 | Go to article overview

Unmentionable Vice Goes Mainstream: Homosexuality's Rapid Rise from Unmentionable Vice to Celebrated Minority Status Is Part of a Campaign to Subvert Judeo-Christian Culture. (Cover Story: Culture War)


Grigg, William Norman, The New American


We [homosexual activists] have gone underground and we have people in every one of the Religious Right's organizations. We're on their mailing lists. We're reading everything they're putting out. We think the words from their mouths trickle down into violence. And when our evidence reaches a critical mass, we're going to use the best attorneys in this country to bring a class action suit in 50 states to have it stopped.

-- Homosexual activist Mel White Larry King Live, August 13, 1993

Is it possible that someday it may be a crime to oppose homosexuality? Could the Holy Bible eventually be designated "hate literature," and preachers be accused of "hate crimes" for condemning the practice from their pulpits? Will parents be forbidden to teach their children to abhor homosexuality? This all seems improbable, or even impossible -- but as the case of Rolf Szabo illustrates, the homosexual movement now has the power to punish those unwilling to "celebrate" that lifestyle.

Prior to his firing in October, Rolf Szabo had worked for Eastman Kodak for 23 years. By all accounts Szabo, a resident of Greece, New York, was a capable and conscientious employee. But Szabo discovered that under the new workplace dogma of "diversity," job performance is less important than displaying correct attitudes.

In early October, according to Rochester ABC television affiliate WOKR, "Kodak's diversity group sent out an e-mail asking employees to 'be supportive' of colleagues who choose to come out on Gay and Lesbian Coming-Out Day." Replying to the message, Szabo tersely told Kodak's sensitivity commissars to stop sending him e-mails that he considered "disgusting and offensive." "I don't need this to do my job," Szabo explained. "It has nothing to do with gay [issues]. It could have been any other topic. It's just that enough is enough. We really don't need this to do our jobs."

According to Szabo, Kodak officials demanded that he sign a letter renouncing his "homophobic" attitudes. When he refused he was fired. "The Eastman Kodak Company gives me a paycheck; they don't own me," Szabo told WOKR. "I'll go somewhere else for a paycheck, that's all."

While extreme, Szabo's experience is not unique. "Diversity groups" like Kodak's are now a standard feature for many major corporations. Corporate workshops and seminars intended to encourage "sensitivity" regarding homosexuality are becoming commonplace, and those who climb the corporate ladder frequently find that advancement depends as much on their supposedly progressive attitudes as it does on their education, abilities, and performance.

"Gay-friendly" policies are in place in hundreds of major corporations. The Human Rights Campaign (HRC), the country's largest and most influential homosexual lobby, compiles a "Corporate Equality Index," rating 319 companies (including 208 in the Fortune 500) on their workplace policies toward homosexuals. Nearly 70 percent of the companies surveyed provide "domestic partner" benefits for homosexual "couples." And 293 of those companies "have nondiscrimination policies that include sexual orientation," reported the October 29th issue of The Advocate.

The Gay Financial Network (GFN) compiles a similar list called the GFN 50, "a comprehensive list of the most powerful and gay-friendly publicly traded companies." To qualify for that list, "Each company had to have a policy in place stating that it does not discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation," provides benefits to "same-sex domestic partners," and has suitable policies regarding "diversity training" and "a ban on any negative stereotypes based on sexual orientation...." Financial services giant American Express (which mandates employee "diversity training") sits atop the GFN 50, with such corporate heavyweights as Walt Disney Co., Microsoft, Xerox, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, and Citigroup also ranking in the top 10.

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