North Korea Will Pose the Next Problem

By Lacey, James | Insight on the News, November 12, 2002 | Go to article overview

North Korea Will Pose the Next Problem


Lacey, James, Insight on the News


North Korea has nukes? I am shocked. North Korea admits it has been building nuclear weapons and administration officials state they already have assembled a couple!

The news hit like a thunderclap on official Washington. How could they be doing this? After all, North Korea promised not to assemble nukes as long as we built two nuclear reactors for them, shipped them 500,000 tons of oil a year, fed their army and overlooked a few other little things.

That these "little things" happened to include firing ballistic missiles over Japan and starving a couple million of its own citizens to death were just not the kind of thing to cause diplomatic upset.

The North Koreans say it is all our fault. They had no other choice after we included them as part of the "Axis of Evil." It is interesting then that as soon as they made the shortlist of evil they immediately started doing whatever it took to ensure that they were worthy of inclusion. But does anyone really believe they managed to jump-start a nuclear-weapons program and build the bomb in a year's time?

I am sure the "head-in-the-sand" Clinton administration would love to believe that. It is easier than admitting it was duped once again.

Maybe in a few months, some former Clinton official will come forward to announce that Bill Clinton had a special, supersecret plan to dispose of the North Korean threat--"if only the incoming Bushies had implemented it!"

It is time to stop looking backward. North Korea has the bomb; now we have to deal with it.

Many on the left already have come forward to ask why North Korea should be treated any differently than Iraq. That should be seen for what it is--code talking for "Let's not do anything about Iraq."

The easy answer, though, is that North Korea is different from Iraq, but I guess it takes a particularly subtle geopolitical mind to see it. As Secretary of State Colin Powell told Fox News, "[Saddam] Hussein in recent years has invaded two of his neighbors. He has used these kinds of weapons of mass destruction against his own people, as well as his neighbors. He has resources available to him. It's a very wealthy little country. They've misspent their wealth, but it is a very wealthy little country. And Korea is an isolated country with no wealth, with a broken economy, a broken society, desperately in need, and with neighbors who are not going to be happy with this new development." Of course those on the left are not often blessed with this kind of keen insight, but for the rest of us the differences are pretty plain. …

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