Critical Essays Revealing, Nurturing Literary pursuits.(BOOKS)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 24, 2002 | Go to article overview

Critical Essays Revealing, Nurturing Literary pursuits.(BOOKS)


Byline: George Core, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

George Garrett, who recently retired from the University of Virginia as Henry Hoyns professor of English, where he ran the program in creative writing, has written 32 books and edited some 20 others. He is the old-fashioned man of letters who has won prizes not only for fiction but poetry.

Perhaps his most distinguished and celebrated work is his trilogy of Elizabethan novels. In addition to fiction long and short, plays, poetry, movie scripts, critical biographies and much else, Mr. Garrett has written a great deal of lively and acute criticism. Ten years ago two selections of this criticism appeared in the same year: "The Sorrows of Fat City" (University of South Carolina Press) and "Whistling in the Dark" (Harcourt Brace).

His most recent book, "Going to See the Elephant," contains pierces written in a literary vein and essays struck as types of reminiscence and of tribute. All of them are informal and easygoing in nature, even those, such as "A Day's Fair Work: The Poetry of Fred Chappell," which are literary criticism. "Nobody that I can think of," Mr. Garrett casually but seriously says, "is as easy and fluent in such a variety of forms as Chappell. Nobody else that I know of has the art of speaking in such a variety of voices."

Tributes to other writers include "The Good Ghost of F. Scott Fitzgerald" ("he was, line by line, move by move, one of the most gifted writers we Americans have ever known"); "Miss Eudora When Last Seen" ("how many other writers have kept your attention and given you nothing but joy for fifty years?"); and Madison Jones (of his novels Mr. Garrett writes: "I had and have strong memories of them, of the great pleasure and envy I felt").

There are dissenting reports on Truman Capote, especially his "In Cold Blood" ("Perry Smith becomes . . . a spooky embodiment of Capote's early fiction"), and on James Dickey ("The press shares Dickey's lack of interest in the tyranny of fact. Literary journalists . . . are more interested in a good story than in prosaic truth. From the beginning, Dickey understood the expectations of the press and lived up to them"). Both pieces deal with the manipulation of fact and fiction by two writers indifferent to telling the truth.

Mr. Garrett's critical essays, whether formal or informal, are devoted largely to modern and contemporary fiction (James Gould Cozzens, John Cheever, Saul Bellow), to Southern letters (William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Eudora Welty), to contemporary poetry (Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Critical Essays Revealing, Nurturing Literary pursuits.(BOOKS)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.