SPOOKY OR WHAT?; When Cassandra's Two-Year-Old Son Told Her His Dad Had Fallen off His Motorbike, She Thought Nothing of It. but He Was Right - and Now She's an Expert on Psychic Children

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), November 28, 2002 | Go to article overview

SPOOKY OR WHAT?; When Cassandra's Two-Year-Old Son Told Her His Dad Had Fallen off His Motorbike, She Thought Nothing of It. but He Was Right - and Now She's an Expert on Psychic Children


Byline: KATRINA TWEEDIE

ONE morning, over breakfast, Cassandra Eason's two-year-old son Jack put his spoon down and said: "Oh, daddy's gone roly-poly off his bike, but he's okay". Then he started eating again.

At that moment her husband John, returning home from a night shift on his motorbike, had slipped on a patch of oil and skidded across the motorway.

When he arrived home later, battered and bruised, Cassandra discovered that the accident, which had stopped the clock on the bike, had occurred at the same moment Jack had looked up to tell her the news.

Working as a primary school teacher in Torrieburn, Fife, while bringing up a family, Cassandra was understandably rattled.

She admits: "I would have run a mile from anyone who even mentioned psychic powers. I was a sceptic and wasn't interested in anything like that.

"It was a strange experience, but we just tried to explain it away as bizarre coincidence. It worried me terrifically rather than frightened me."

Cassandra admits she was a person who liked everything orderly. She was bringing up her children to the letter of the children's manuals and was not aware of any particular intuitive link with them.

She says: "I didn't know when they were crying when I wasn't there and I didn't wake up in the night just before them, as some mothers do."

But the incident with Jack had sparked something and she decided to research the phenomenon. What she discovered astounded her. She explains: "I found this entirely hidden world of children with psychic experiences.

"My research prompted a huge response from mothers, claiming their child had seen things, such as a dead granny.

"All this threw everything I'd believed up into the air. I suddenly became much more intuitive myself - more aware and a lot less sceptical."

After much research, her first book, The Psychic Powers Of Children, was published. It established Cassandra as the foremost expert on intuitive links within families.

In it, she described how the intuitive side of the brain is strong in children, especially before they go to school and are taught logical ways of thinking.

Some 15 years, five children and more than 50 books later, she is much in demand from parents eager to find out if their children have merely over- active imaginations or are, indeed, psychic.

Critics argue that no sane mother wants their child to see their dead granny sitting at the end of their bed.

In scenes reminiscent of Bruce Willis's movie Sixth Sense, in which the little boy mouths: `I see dead people', the fact remains that some children do appear to have bizarre, unexplainable, experiences.

CASSANDRA says: "Many of the experiences of children you simply could not explain away. And when I looked back, I remembered that I'd seen ghosts, but they had all been dismissed as imagination, something no-one talked about."

In fact, following the death of her mother, when Cassandra was 19, a doctor prescribed tranquillisers when she reported seeing her mum.

Later, her daughter Miranda, aged four at the time, started talking about her granny, describing in detail her pleated hair despite never having seen a photograph. Her grandmother, of course, had died 25 years earlier.

Cassandra, who now lives on the Isle of Wight, insists: "She couldn't have known these details, but it really helped my healing process."

Having abandoned teaching to take a psychology degree and write full- time, she then went on to study maternal instincts.

She found one new mum who had been on a rare night out at the cinema with her husband when she suddenly smelled burning.

Insisting they return home because something was wrong, the couple left immediately and got on a bus for the seven- mile journey home, where they found smoke pouring under the front door. …

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