All for One ... Egyptians Are Boycotting American and Israeli Products in Support of the Palestinians of the Occupied Territories. (Boycott)

By McGrath, Cam | The Middle East, December 2002 | Go to article overview

All for One ... Egyptians Are Boycotting American and Israeli Products in Support of the Palestinians of the Occupied Territories. (Boycott)


McGrath, Cam, The Middle East


"Children are dying in Palestine and the world doesn't seem to care. We have to do something," says taxi driver Hajj Mohammed Ali Rizqallah, whose view is partially obscured by the Palestinian flag stickers he has affixed to his car's windscreen. A chequered Palestinian kiffeyeh is draped over the driver's seat. Rizqallah purchased it from one of the ubiquitous scarf and flag hawkers that wander from window to window among vehicles stuck in Cairo traffic. The hawkers have become a litmus test for Egyptian sentiment, appearing in droves whenever Israel launches an offensive on the Palestinian Territories and vanishing as the situation resolves.

"[Israeli prime minister] Sharon is a terrorist," grumbles Rizqallah. "Every day. he kills Palestinian women and children while Europe and America do nothing to stop him."

When the Palestinian Intifada began in September 2000, many Egyptians believed the determination and suffering of the Palestinian people would Compel western nations to intervene and curb Israeli aggression. Two years later, with some 1,600 Palestinians and 600 Israelis dead, hope has faded for a comprehensive peace in the region.

When asked what the two-year-old uprising has accomplished, Rizqallah quickly retorts: "It's shown the world the bravery and resolve of the Palestinians." Egyptians unanimously agree.

Egyptians have always been sympathetic to the Palestinian cause. For 50 years, they have sought to liberate Palestinian territory from Israeli occupation, spilling blood on the battlefield in 1948, 1967 and 1973. Since the start of the Intifada, dozens of Egyptian youths have been caught trying to sneak across the border into the Gaza Strip to join the uprising.

"All Egyptians sympathise with the Palestinian people, and many believe the government is not doing enough to support them," says sociologist Azza Korayyem. "They are desperate to help in any way they can, even if it means risking their own life."

In the late 1980s, the Egyptian government faced a formidable challenge in countering the growing tide of Islamic extremism. No sooner would it deal an effective blow to a troublesome sheikh or Islamist group than another would appear in its place.

Solidarity movements are a new multi-headed hydra that threaten to undermine the government's political hegemony. Unlike religious extremism, which draws primarily from the socially and economically disenfranchised, these movements draw from the entire population, some 67 million Palestinian sympathisers.

The Intifada has spawned dozens of pro-Palestinian organisations, attracting members from across the political, religious and social spectrum. No small task in a country characterised by 25 years of political factionalism.

Grassroots movements unite Nass-erists, communists and Islamists under the banner of the Palestinian cause. "During the last two years we worked to mobilise popular opinion and tried to create many sub-committees and expand membership," says Zoheir El Arabi, a journalist and member of the Popular Committee to Boycott Israeli, American and British Products (PCBIAB). PCBIAB encourages Egyptians to boycott the products of countries it perceives as supporting Israeli aggression against the Palestinian people. A list it distributes in schools, villages and mosques names various consumer products to boycott, offering "Intifada-friendly" alternatives. The boycott has cut into the sales of the listed products, say economists, but more importantly to El Arabi, is its psychological effect. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

All for One ... Egyptians Are Boycotting American and Israeli Products in Support of the Palestinians of the Occupied Territories. (Boycott)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.