WLP's Multi-Regional Meeting on Women's Leadership and Institutional Change

By Balaghi, Shiva | The Middle East Women's Studies Review, Fall 2001 | Go to article overview

WLP's Multi-Regional Meeting on Women's Leadership and Institutional Change


Balaghi, Shiva, The Middle East Women's Studies Review


On June 7, 2001 Women's Learning Partnership (WLP) convened a cross-regional, interdisciplinary meeting on women's leadership at the School for Advanced International Studies of John's Hopkins University in Washington, DC. The meetings were co-sponsored by the Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies at New York University (NYU). Participants in the meeting represented diverse professional, cultural, and religious perspectives. Together, they closely examined WLP's model for re-imagining, fostering and supporting women's leadership and institutional change in the Global South. WLP's aim is not only to increase the numbers of women in leadership positions but to rethink the concept of leadership at a fundamental .level. "There are different types of leadership--formal, institutional, inspirational. Our model of leadership is charged with change," said Farhad Kazemi, Vice-Provost of NYU who facilitated the morning sessions.

A primary focus of the day-long meeting was to discuss WLP's new handbook entitled Leading to Choices: A Leadership Training Handbook for Women that was produced in partnership with L'Association Democratique des femmes du Maroc (ADFM) in Morocco, BAOBAB for Women's Human Rights in Nigeria, and Women's Affairs Technical Committee (WATC) in Palestine. The WLP project serves as a useful example for other women's organizations seeking to bridge global and local activism. Using information technology to its full potential, the collaborating organizations hashed out problems and solutions through emails, letters, and telephone calls; drafts of the manual were faxed and emailed back and forth. The resulting handbook presents cases of positive and constructive leadership from around the world and serves as a vehicle for education, organization, and collaboration. Meant to be used in workshops, the handbook is adaptable to various contexts and is designed to create learning partnerships by encouraging communication, listening, mentoring, and consensus-building. Haleh Vaziri, a contributor to the handbook explained, "The case studies in Leading to Choices ask each participant to look within themselves, to recognize their own talents, to examine their world, discover solutions to the problems around them, and to defy the notion that change is not possible."

The day culminated in a public conference that was attended by some 200 activists and scholars. Introducing the session, Mahnaz Afkhami (President, Women's Learning Partnership) explained, "We would like to go beyond the matter of equity in numbers and examine the kinds of leadership structures that have lead to the challenges we face today.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

WLP's Multi-Regional Meeting on Women's Leadership and Institutional Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.