Customs Agents Smash Money-Laundering Ring; Charge 12 with Illegally Funneling Cash, Goods to Iraqis.(NATION)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 20, 2002 | Go to article overview

Customs Agents Smash Money-Laundering Ring; Charge 12 with Illegally Funneling Cash, Goods to Iraqis.(NATION)


Byline: Jerry Seper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

U.S. Customs Service agents have dismantled a global underground wire-transfer network that illegally funneled $12 million in cash and goods to Iraq in violation of the U.S. embargo against Saddam Hussein's government, Customs Commissioner Robert C. Bonner said yesterday.

A Seattle company and 12 persons in Iraq, Jordan, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Great Britain and the United States were named in a grand jury indictment handed up Wednesday and unsealed yesterday in U.S. District Court in Seattle.

They were accused of money laundering and conspiracy to launder money in violation of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act.

"These indictments and arrests are a significant law enforcement achievement, part of the ongoing efforts to block the flow of all illegal funds to embargoed countries like Iraq," Mr. Bonner said during an afternoon press conference. "The message here is that ... we are serious about investigating and prosecuting anyone who violates the embargo against Iraq.

"It is against U.S. law to send any money, funds, directly or indirectly, or goods to Iraq, and we intend to enforce the law," he said.

Six persons were taken into custody during early-morning raids yesterday in Seattle, Nashville, Tenn., St. Louis, Dallas, Phoenix and Roanoke. The act prohibits sending money or goods to Iraq, a country that is subject to a U.S. embargo, and has been since August 1990.

Mr. Bonner said investigators still are trying to determine whether any of the illegally transferred cash or the unidentified goods purchased with the money may have been used to bankroll terrorist activities or to purchase weapons of mass destruction.

"I can't say right now that we have any connection," he said, "but you can't rule it out."

Those arrested were Hussein Al-Shafei in Seattle, Malik Almaliki in Roanoke, Kaalid Amen in St. Louis, Salam Said Alkhursan in Dallas, Ali Noor Alsutani in Nashville, and Ali Almarhoun in Phoenix. They are accused of conspiring with and at the direction of Mr. Al-Shafei in his unlicensed money-service business, known as Al-Shafei Family Connect Inc. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Customs Agents Smash Money-Laundering Ring; Charge 12 with Illegally Funneling Cash, Goods to Iraqis.(NATION)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.