Too Much Politics, Too Much corruption.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)

Manila Bulletin, December 20, 2002 | Go to article overview

Too Much Politics, Too Much corruption.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)


Byline: Fred M. Lobo

TOO much politics and too much corruption are making us a weak nation.

Like pestering boils that must be lanced and excised of puss, these national ills must be seriously dealt with. Otherwise, we will continue to whimper, whirl and drift.

No less than President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo has regrettably admitted that the country is in a rut because of too much politics.

We hear the same cry against too much politics and corruption from the Catholic Bishop of the Philippines (CBCP), the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI), the militarybacked Rebolusyonaryong Alyansang Makabayan (RAM) and the multi-sectoral group KOALISYON.

"Too much politics contributing to a weak state is a collective blame we must all share in," President GMA has lamented, calling for "change."

The "weak state" inherited over the years can be seen from three symptoms outlined by the President: the widening gap between the rich and the poor, a political system based on personality and patronage, and perceived widespread corruption in government.

GMA has decried "too much politics" in the country as characterized by attempts of destabilization, black propaganda and character assassination.

Perhaps, a recent example is the case of a super-rich congressman who made his mark by accusing a Cabinet secretary of allegedly pressing his financial luck too far. The controversy has shocked the nation and turned the Latin maxim "The thing speaks for itself" into Res Impsa loquitor.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Too Much Politics, Too Much corruption.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.