Portraits of Learning: Here, We Recognize Students' Artistic and Technical Achievements in Digital Photography

By Kennedy, Kristen | Technology & Learning, December 2002 | Go to article overview

Portraits of Learning: Here, We Recognize Students' Artistic and Technical Achievements in Digital Photography


Kennedy, Kristen, Technology & Learning


For Technology & Learning's second annual Portraits of Learning contest, we asked students for their photographic interpretations of our contest theme, "learning with technology." The response was both impressive and overwhelming: We received over 150 digital entries from K-12 students nationwide, with multiple submissions coming from schools in New York, Florida, and Iowa--just a few of the states whose students are well represented in our list of winners. We're especially proud that our first place overall winner--Eileen Cowdery for her photo "Authority"--is a student of Rosemary Shaw, one of this year's National Ed Tech Leaders of the Year. And, thanks to iClick, who provided prizes for our three top winners, Cowdery will receive a class pack of 10 digital cameras.

We've organized the 13 first- and second-place winners of this year's contest by school-age group, and placed three overall winners to highlight the photos our judges felt were among this year's best. In addition to the winners published here, 20 finalists are currently on display in our online gallery at www.techlearning.com.

Elementary School Winners

First Place

Exploring the Alphabet

Dixie Moncus, Jackie White, and kindergarten students Harmony Elementary School Harmony, N.C.

With the help of media specialist Jackie White and teacher Dixie Moncus, the kindergarten kids from Harmony learned the letters of the alphabet by photographing each other using props to represent letters and sounds. Pictured here are Tristan James, Summer Pearson, Jasmine Barnes, and Jacob Holland, modeling the letters A, C, E, and M, respectively.

Elementary School Winners

Second Place

Reflection

Chrissy Logue, Grade 4 Sporting Hill Elementary School Mechanicsburg, Pa.

Got Technology?

Theresa Coviello's fourth and fifth grade technology students George Washington Elementary School Mohegan Lake, N.Y.

Middle School Winners

First Place

Authority

Eileen Cowdery, Grade 7 Millennium Middle School Sanford, Fla.

After experimenting with different camera angles, Cowdery shot picture of school security guard Emilio Stewart while lying on the floor. The effect reveals the powerful role Stewart plays at Millennium Middle School. Cowdery aptly titled the photo "Authority" because, she wrote, "Mr. Stewart looks like someone who's in charge, someone who demands respect from the kids, someone in authority."

Middle School Winners

First Place

Mirror Image

Danielle Cassaday, Grade 8 North Fort Myers Academy for the Arts North Fort Myers, Fla.

Cassaday took to heart her teacher's advice about having her ducks in a row when she created this colorful, dynamic image. By capturing just the right amount of light and enhancing the image with editing tools from Adobe Photo Deluxe, Cassaday created a reflection of the ducks' image in the surface of a chair.

Middle School Winners

Second Place

NeeDeep in Grass

Ryan Keightley, Grade 7 Millennium Middle School Sanford, Fla. …

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Portraits of Learning: Here, We Recognize Students' Artistic and Technical Achievements in Digital Photography
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