Letters


Politics

CONGO - FITTING THE PIECES

As usual, your December Cover Story, Congo, Rejigging the pieces (African Business, December 2002), was comprehensive and accomplished. It was perhaps the neatest summery of the chaotic events in the Democratic Republic of the Congo I have read in a long while and enhances your reputation as the best publication of African events in the world.

My only quarrel is that Neil Ford's article was a tad too optimistic. It relies heavily on the assumption that the peace accord would remain in force and that the warring parties, both domestic and foreign would now consciously gear themselves up to rebuilding the shattered country.

I have spent nearly a quarter of my life working in various capacities in that fascinating and sometimes delightful country and I would like to see nothing more than real peace descend. However, as we know, fighting broke out even before the ink dried on the paper and although some sort of peace holds, the kind envisaged by your article is still in the realms of fantasy.

There are just too many vested interests who stand to lose too much for anyone to give up without a determined struggle.

So what is the solution? I don't know. Partition the Congo into smaller, more manageable units? Bring in a larger peace-keeping force until real law and order can be achieved? All these ideas have been mooted before but none have any basis of hard logic.

After all this time, I have come to the conclusion that the solution to the Congo's many problems (including its enormous size!) need collective lateral thinking. It is really no good finding local solutions to local symptoms. You end up with a multitude of sticking plasters while new boils spring up everywhere.

I suggest an international panel, drawn from academia, politics, business and public administration sit down to discuss the problems of the Congo and starts with a clean sheet. Then we might get a complete picture of the complex nature of this vast country and begin to tackle each problem area separately until the jigsaw begins to fit together. What do you think of this idea?

John Rosenthal

Cardiff

UK

* Over to you readers. What do you think of Mr Rosenthal's idea? - Editor.

Tunisia

WHERE ARE THE BLACK TUNISIANS?

Regarding your report about Tunisia - 15 years of the Change - The Republic of the Future (African Business November 2002), I have one question. While on my second visit to Tunisia I heard different stories from some black Tunisians regarding their position and the racism directed against them. In all your reports of the last months I have never read about them, nor seen any pictures of these Tunisians.

Will you please do some research on this matter?

Mrs (Dr) O.J. Nicol

(Address not given).

From my own observations, 'black' Tunisians as you call them, are largely integrated in the wider society which is fairly multiracial in composition - the history of Tunisia indicates that the present population has genes from Phoenicians, Greeks, Italians (Romans), Africans, Arabs, Jews and Turks among others. I have myself met Tunisians with more pronounced African characteristics who are ambassadors, high government officials, leading business people and quite dominant on the sports field.

Editor.

Kenya

TERRORISM OUT!

For a very long time African and other peace loving peoples have been sympathetic to the plight of Palestinians, but the killing of women and children with such impunity is inexcusable. This goes for Israel also. Killing children and sickly old women will not reduce terrorism in the Middle East. Israel should grow-up and exercise restraint.

The terrorists who perpetrated the recent outrages in Mombasa, and bombed the US embassies in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam, are presumably allied to the same cause, Palestinian liberation, that African countries have continually supported at the UN for many years. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Letters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.