CLEVER CHRIS,12, IS BRAINIEST KID; City Lad Picks Up Top TV Honour

Birmingham Evening Mail (England), January 1, 2003 | Go to article overview

CLEVER CHRIS,12, IS BRAINIEST KID; City Lad Picks Up Top TV Honour


Byline: GRAHAM YOUNG

HE WAS brought up on old-fashioned Ladybird books and didn't use a computer until he was nine, but last night 12year-old Christopher Guerin became Britain's Brainiest Kid.

The eldest child of a factory worker and nursing home sister from Great Barr, Birmingham, he crowned a spectacular 2002 by winning the title in front of millions of New Year's Eve viewers.

Christopher became a Mensa member in March when his IQ was measured at 162 - higher than Carol Vorderman's rating when she shot to fame on Countdown 20 years ago and way above the national average of 100.

Last night, Carol presented Christopher with his trophy after he had beaten off the challenge of thousands of other bright children to face two girls in the final showdown.

Modest Christopher said he was 'really surprised' to have won, but had faithfully kept his secret since the show was recorded in August.

'My friends have kept asking me and it's been quite fun not telling them. A lot of them came to the conclusion that I hadn't won otherwise I wouldn't have been able to keep it a secret.

'But I think it's a good achievement to have won the title and I'm very pleased.'

Christopher's favourite subject at King Edward VI Aston School, Birmingham, is Middle Ages history, but he loves maths, too, coming in the top six per cent of a recent national junior maths challenge. …

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CLEVER CHRIS,12, IS BRAINIEST KID; City Lad Picks Up Top TV Honour
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