ITC Helping Business Play Its Part in Trade Negotiations

By Belisle, J. Denis | International Trade Forum, July-September 2002 | Go to article overview

ITC Helping Business Play Its Part in Trade Negotiations


Belisle, J. Denis, International Trade Forum


Effective collaboration presupposes three things:

Successful negotiation for the Doha Development Agenda depend to a large degree on the quality of Collaboration between national trade negotiators and political leaders, on the one hand and business leaders on the other in its absence national trade negotiating strategies cannot serve the business interests of a country. ITC has programmes to help business pay its part effectively. (ITC Specials)

* a desire on the part of public servants to engage in serious dialogue with the private sector;

* the existence of mechanisms to facilitate and encourage dialogue; and

* a well-informed business community, able to make a meaningful contribution to articulating the country's interests. Businesses have a vital role in shaping their country's negotiating strategy--whether for commodities, manufactures or services--in a way that helps them to capitalize on opportunities from the resulting agreements. Their support for a freer trading environment alone has a positive impact. On the operational level, their perception of which areas are of critical business importance and their analytical inputs to support negotiating positions are invaluable to their negotiators.

Business engages in advocacy as a matter of course in industrialized countries. But in most developing and transition countries, the business community often needs support from well-designed, pragmatic technical assistance programmes to play this role effectively.

The Doha Ministerial Declaration recognized ITC's contribution in this respect. ITC provides a unique and essential service to the business community in developing and transition economies. Its programmes increase awareness of the significance and content of the WTO rules and show businesses how to take advantage of the multilateral trading system. They also promote business communities' dialogue with their respective governments in order to better reflect their preoccupations with the business implications of national negotiating strategies.

ITC runs a number of relevant technical assistance programmes both on its own and in partnership with WTO and UNCTAD.

* ITC's World Tr@de Net is a unique programme assisting the business community to find its place in the Doha negotiating process. The programme has over 40 member countries working to strengthen business-government consultation.

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ITC Helping Business Play Its Part in Trade Negotiations
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