Proposed Anti-Terror Rules for Travelers Get Personal

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 4, 2003 | Go to article overview

Proposed Anti-Terror Rules for Travelers Get Personal


Byline: Frank J. Murray, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Justice Department yesterday published proposed anti-terrorism regulations that for the first time would require American citizens traveling abroad to disclose detailed personal information.

Under the new proposal, Americans on commercial air and sea travel would be required to fill out forms detailing their comings and goings.

Under the new regulations, the information would be sent electronically to the government to be matched against security databases.

"It's another way to enhance security for travelers," Immigration and Naturalization Service spokeswoman Kimberly Weismann told the Associated Press.

The rule published yesterday would not apply to domestic flights.

INS spokesman Chris Bentley said the portion involving American citizens and resident aliens with green cards will not take effect until a final rule is imposed after a 30-day comment period.

But he said the rule was put in force on an interim basis Wednesday, requiring details on all temporary foreign visitors such as tourists, students or business travelers.

The American Civil Liberties Union, which has been critical of much of the administration's terrorism information-gathering initiatives, said these rules should not encroach on people's privacy.

"We don't see a huge downside," spokeswoman Emily Whitfield told the Associated Press.

Congress ordered the changes in legislation that was signed into law by President Bush last May. The legislation also mandated that the rules concerning the issuance of visas to visitors and students coming to the United States be tightened, as well as that additional Border Patrol officers be hired.

The proposal requires all passengers arriving or departing, as well as crew members, to provide information such as name, date of birth, citizenship, sex, passport number and country of issuance, country of residence, U.S. visa number and other details of its issuance, address while in the United States, and, where it applies, alien registration number.

All commercial airlines, cargo flights, cruise ships and other vessels carrying crew or passengers would be affected, with the exception of most ferry boats. Private transportation is not affected, nor are commercial buses or trains.

An INS press statement announcing the proposed rule on Tuesday said a new law "requires the submission of Advanced Passenger Information System (APIS) on all temporary foreign visitors. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Proposed Anti-Terror Rules for Travelers Get Personal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.