Reviewing Pardon Power/death Cases; (Editor's Note: In Illinois Executive Review of Death Row Cases Has Shown That Miscarriage of Justice Has Failed the State, Starting with Rogue Cops. Our Supreme Court Last Week Sent Home Two Innocent Prisoners after Staying in Death Row for Years.)

Manila Bulletin, January 13, 2003 | Go to article overview

Reviewing Pardon Power/death Cases; (Editor's Note: In Illinois Executive Review of Death Row Cases Has Shown That Miscarriage of Justice Has Failed the State, Starting with Rogue Cops. Our Supreme Court Last Week Sent Home Two Innocent Prisoners after Staying in Death Row for Years.)


THE executive power to grant pardon is almost absolute. In the US, the president has the power to grant reprieves and pardons for offenses against the United States, except in cases of impeachment.

In September 1974, President Ford dropped a bombshell by announcing the unconditional pardon of former President Nixon a decision he reached without consulting party leaders, members of Congress, the special Watergate prosecutor, or the public. Fords press secretary expressed the disapproval felt by millions of Americans by immediately resigning.

(President Nixon had appointed Ford as vice president in place of Spiro Agnew who resigned after pleading guilty to tax evasion. After Nixons resignation Ford assumed the presidency and became the first unelected vice president and president in US history. Analysts attribute Fords narrow defeat by Jimmy Carter in November 1976 to his unconditional pardon of Nixon.)

State governors power of pardon

State governors in all 50 states have the power of pardon under the state constitution and other laws.

Last Friday (Jan. 10), Republican Governor George H. Ryan (Illinois) extended absolute pardon to four death row inmates, saying they were tortured into making false confessions. He commuted death sentences of 167 convicts. In his speech at Northwestern University, Ryan condemned the states criminal justice system for sending innocent men to prison to be executed. He said: We have evidence from four men, who did not know each other, all getting beaten, tortured and convicted on the basis of the confessions they allegedly provide.

According to Gov. Ryan Chicago police tortured the four death convicts into confessing to murders they had not committed. The three stayed in death row for at least 12 years and the fourth inmate was on death row the longest more than 17 years.

Ryan blamed rogue cops, zealous prosecutors, incompetent defense lawyers and judges who rule on technicalities rather than on what is right. (The New York Times)

Relevance to RP

We are referring to the justice system in the fifth largest state in the US where car plates proudly proclaim their states hero Lincoln country.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reviewing Pardon Power/death Cases; (Editor's Note: In Illinois Executive Review of Death Row Cases Has Shown That Miscarriage of Justice Has Failed the State, Starting with Rogue Cops. Our Supreme Court Last Week Sent Home Two Innocent Prisoners after Staying in Death Row for Years.)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.