Kean Steps in for Kissinger: Henry Kissinger's Abrupt Resignation from the 9-11 Commission Leaves the Cover-Up in the Hands of an Establishment Second-Stringer. (Conspiracy Update)

By Grigg, William Norman | The New American, January 13, 2003 | Go to article overview

Kean Steps in for Kissinger: Henry Kissinger's Abrupt Resignation from the 9-11 Commission Leaves the Cover-Up in the Hands of an Establishment Second-Stringer. (Conspiracy Update)


Grigg, William Norman, The New American


Forced to choose between cementing the 9-11 cover-up and continuing the cover-up of his corrupt dealings as an international power broker, Henry Kissinger favored the latter. On Friday, December 13th, Kissinger informed the White House of his resignation as head of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks. The ruling Establishment has a deep bench, however. On the following Monday President Bush announced the appointment of former New Jersey Governor Thomas Kean, who, like Kissinger, is a member in good standing of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Just one day before his unexpected resignation, Kissinger had met with relatives of 9-11 victims to discuss potential conflicts of interest arising from his international consulting firm, Kissinger Associates (KA). As previously reported in these pages (see "Kissinger: Cover-up King" in our December 30th issue), Kissinger created his consulting firm during the mid-1980s in collaboration with Brent Scowcroft and Lawrence Eagleburger. The firm gives secret high-level briefings to an equally secretive list of clients. Essentially a form of matchmaking between foreign rulers and private corporate and banking interests, KA briefing sessions are conducted orally, with nothing committed to paper.

After President Bush announced Kissinger's appointment, critics from across the political spectrum protested that Kissinger' s business contacts with foreign interests created potential conflicts of interest. Commentators and Democratic politicians demanded that Kissinger submit financial disclosures detailing any potential conflicts. The administration, reflecting its penchant for official secrecy, insisted that because Kissinger was an uncompensated presidential appointee, he wasn't required by law to submit a financial disclosure statement.

However, two reports from the Congressional Research Service concluded that all commission members would be required to comply with Senate ethics guidelines, including financial disclosure requirements. This finding prompted former Senator George Mitchell, selected by Democratic congressional leaders to serve as commission co-chair, to resign from the panel shortly before Kissinger did.

It's possible that Kissinger--who exists in a cocoon of privilege--simply believed that he could bluff his way through the conflict-of-interest issue. After all, that strategy worked for his underlings at Kissinger Associates. Lawrence Eagleburger refused to disclose the firm's client list during his 1989 Senate confirmation hearings; Eagleburger went on to serve as assistant secretary of state, and then acting secretary of state, during the first Bush administration. Nor was Brent Scowcroft required to reveal potential KA-related conflicts before serving as national security adviser to George Bush (the elder).

Unspecified "Assurances"

During his December 12th meeting with representatives from 9-11 family groups, Kissinger offered unspecified "assurances" that his business contacts would not compromise his role as chairman of the terrorist commission. According to an AP report, Kissinger "outlined procedures he was considering for the commission's 10 members to disclose potential conflicts of interest.

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Kean Steps in for Kissinger: Henry Kissinger's Abrupt Resignation from the 9-11 Commission Leaves the Cover-Up in the Hands of an Establishment Second-Stringer. (Conspiracy Update)
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