Anti-Joyriding Group Takes Its Message to PM

The People (London, England), January 26, 2003 | Go to article overview

Anti-Joyriding Group Takes Its Message to PM


Byline: SINEAD KING

MEMBERS of a cross-community anti-joyriding campaign were hoping for a major victory last night after messages of support began rolling in from across Britain.

West Belfast-based Families Bereaved Through Car Crime, which was set up with the support of The People, has fought hard to get its message heard.

And now it's hoping for a change in the law which will put joyriding thugs behind bars for longer.

Last week campaigners took their message to Westminster - to Prime Minister's door - with a petition signed by thousands of Ulster people.

Now the trail-blazing group, which is backed by unionists and nationalists, has won support from other groups fighting the same cause across the UK.

Spokesman Tommy Holland said they were winning recognition from far and wide after their trip to London.

"The families involved have brought this vital campaign forward in memory of those who have died," he said.

Supporters last week lobbied Westminster MPs in their bid to secure a minimum 15-year sentence for car thieves convicted of killing someone.

Families Bereaved Through Car Crime also wants the charge of being carried in a stolen car changed to that of being an accessory to the crime. …

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