Rising Opposition to War. (Editorials)

The Nation, February 10, 2003 | Go to article overview

Rising Opposition to War. (Editorials)


At a press conference on January 20, only two days after thousands of Americans marched in cities and towns across the nation to oppose going to war with Iraq, Defense Secretary Rumsfeld warned, "In the case of Iraq, we're nearing the end of the long road and with every other option exhausted." The next day George W. Bush, angered by the French foreign minister's attack on Washington's "impatience" with the inspection process, added, "This looks like a rerun of a bad movie and I'm not interested in watching it."

The Bush Administration has been going hellbent down Rumsfeld's road, ignoring the UN Security Council where not only France but Russia, China, Germany and others favor giving inspections a chance. Turkey, where 90 percent oppose war, is refusing to permit a large US force to launch an invasion from its soil. Ankara is preparing to host a summit meeting of regional powers seeking to pressure Iraq to cooperate with UN inspectors in an effort to head off a war. On the Continent popular opposition to a conflict runs around 70 to 80 percent.

While Rumsfeld accelerates the military buildup in the Gulf, antiwar forces have stepped up the mobilization at home. A quarter of a million or more protesters in Washington, San Francisco and elsewhere carried off the biggest antiwar demonstrations since the Vietnam era. This time national TV and papers across the country gave them full and respectful play. On February 15, more protests will be held here and all over the world.

The opposition encompasses a broad range of Americans, from pacifists and aging hippies to suburban moms and small-business people. They came from all over, boarding buses in Maine and Mississippi for the long drive to Washington. They came as individuals and as groups--including the National Council of Churches, Physicians for Social Responsibility, A Jewish Voice for Peace, US Labor Against the War (a coalition of more than sixty unions), United for Peace and Justice (a network of 150 groups), ANSWER (the coalition that organized the Washington march) and more. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rising Opposition to War. (Editorials)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.