Schools Take Flight for Centennial. (Curriculum Update: The Latest Developments in Math, Science, Language Arts and Social Studies)

By Lorenzetti, Jennifer Patterson | District Administration, October 2002 | Go to article overview

Schools Take Flight for Centennial. (Curriculum Update: The Latest Developments in Math, Science, Language Arts and Social Studies)


Lorenzetti, Jennifer Patterson, District Administration


With the centennial of the Wright brothers' first powered flight coming up in December 2003, many educators are looking to inject flight into their lessons. From complete curricula to work shops and grants, a number of cross-curricular resources are available to prepare teachers and administrators.

Coming out of Dayton, Ohio, is the Inventing Flight curriculum. "Students study the physical science of control, lift and power" while learning about the history of flight, says Dave Frech of ThinkTV: Greater Dayton Public Television, the producer of the curriculum. The curriculum uses video, DVD multimedia exercises and online activities to teach middle-grade students the physical science, historical basis and problem-solving skills that were necessary for humans to take to the air.

"The Wright brothers took a different approach from their contemporaries when learning to fly," says William Roess, COO of Inventing Flight. "We believe that this curriculum not Only allows students the opportunity to explore the concepts behind powered flight, but also the ingenuity behind the discovery." Roess says he expects the lessons to "have a shelf life of five to 10 years."

The curiculum is being distributed free to all school districts in Ohio, and districts elsewhere can purchase it for $295.

Of course, when one thinks of flight, one thinks of NASA.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Schools Take Flight for Centennial. (Curriculum Update: The Latest Developments in Math, Science, Language Arts and Social Studies)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.