Setting Effective Standards: Online Resources Make Alignment with Standards Easy and Effective. (the Online Edge)

By Dyrli, Odvard Egil | District Administration, November 2001 | Go to article overview

Setting Effective Standards: Online Resources Make Alignment with Standards Easy and Effective. (the Online Edge)


Dyrli, Odvard Egil, District Administration


This fall I worked with a K-12 school system to align its curriculum with state and professional education standards, including those from the International Society for Technology in Education. This required labeling existing curriculum objectives and developing new learning activities to comply with directives such as having grade 3-5 students "use telecommunications efficiently and effectively to access remote information, communicate with others in support of direct and independent learning, and pursue personal interests." This ISTE standard led us to evaluate and select online student research resources, sources for collaborative projects and access to content area experts.

I have now aligned programs with new curriculum standards numerous times through the years, prior to seeking accreditation or submitting proposals for funding. For example, when the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics developed math standards in the `80s, graphing calculators were in their infancy and the Internet was largely unknown, and these technologies became prominent in the new standards of 2000. Although aligning the curriculum with standards was always painstaking and time-consuming work, the results were worth the effort in comparing what we did in our classrooms with other states.

UNQUESTIONABLE STANDARDS But the downside of the current standards movement is that there are now multiple standards in every state and content area, and these are sometimes in conflict. For example, after agonizing about whether specific curriculum components met one standard or another, no one ever questioned any of my decisions, so I often wondered if the labels were more important than their accuracy. And, no funding or accreditation agency ever visited our classrooms to see if our purported compliance had any relationship to practice. Furthermore, almost every commercial program now claims to be "aligned with education standards" in some way, yet hardly anyone questions what that means. As Secretary of Education Rod Paige stated, "The highest standards in the world mean nothing if we do not also ensure that students are learning."

Although the selection and use of curriculum standards will always be polarizing issues in education, the federal government and most states have committed to standards-centered rewards and sanctions based on school evaluation data. And "pay for performance" concepts are gathering momentum (see the Education Commission of the States Web site, www.ecs.org). It's time to check out the online resources and join the debate.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Setting Effective Standards: Online Resources Make Alignment with Standards Easy and Effective. (the Online Edge)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.