TI's Professional Development: Teachers Teaching with Technology Have Long Provided Training to Educators to Use Handhelds for Instruction, with Cumulative Benefits. (the [T.Sup.3] Program)

By Branch, Al | District Administration, November 2001 | Go to article overview

TI's Professional Development: Teachers Teaching with Technology Have Long Provided Training to Educators to Use Handhelds for Instruction, with Cumulative Benefits. (the [T.Sup.3] Program)


Branch, Al, District Administration


John Brunsting says he and other faculty members stumbled upon it about 13 years ago, but now he considers it an integral part of the education process in his Illinois region.

"At this point, you'd be hard to find any math or science teachers in this general area who haven't gone through the program," says Brunsting, a former high school math teacher turned high school administrator.

The program he is referring to is Texas Instruments' professional development program called Teachers Teaching with Technology.

According to TI, "[T.sup.3] provides training for educators who are interested in enhancing the teaching and learning of mathematics and science through appropriate use of educational technology." One crucial key to TI's program is that the training is both developed and taught by fellow educators who are experienced in the application and teaching of particular courses in math and science.

The [T.sup.3] program offers professional development that is packaged and tailored to the individual educational needs of school districts throughout the U.S.TI customizes its courses to match local curriculum and standards, and it also tailors the duration of each professional development program, though many last for a week in the summer. In addition to on-site workshops, [T.sup.3] offers online instruction, annual conferences and regional conferences.

Covers All Grade Levels

At Hinsdale Central High School in Hinsdale, Ill., where Brunsting is director of teaching and learning, the school has trained more than 3,000-area middle school and high school teachers, and a few college professors. [T.sup.3] courses typically cost about a few hundred dollars per participant.

"We had a real desire to provide high-quality in-service for our staff, and we were excited by the visualization aspects that technology gave us, especially with graphing calculators and such" Brunsting says.

Since 1988 when [T.sup.3] was created by Ohio State University professors Bert Waits and Frank Demana, more than 60,000 teachers have been trained in the program, according to TI. The pair started by offering high school teachers one-week workshops in using graphing calculators to help students visualize pre-calculus and calculus concepts. Now [T.sup.3] is a worldwide organization, conducting professional development for teachers in more than 25 countries including Europe and Latin America.

During the years, the [T.sup.3] course offerings have grown to include elementary school and middle school instruction, in addition to some college-level offerings. Teachers leave [T.sup.3] institutes with knowledge in how to develop lesson plans and deliver instruction using TI handheld technology in the classroom. They learn methods for teaching students how to "explore" theories and build models, in addition to visualizing mathematics and science, with the aid of TI handhelds.

Partnering With Districts

Feedback from educators who have participated in [T.sup.3] courses provide some insight as to why TI's professional development program is so popular. For one thing, as comments taken from participant response forms indicate, [T.sup.3] instructors motivate by example:

"Just wanted to take a minute to let you know that you have inspired me!"

"I feel much more comfortable. This instructor made me feel like I am embarking on a very worthwhile learning adventure. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

TI's Professional Development: Teachers Teaching with Technology Have Long Provided Training to Educators to Use Handhelds for Instruction, with Cumulative Benefits. (the [T.Sup.3] Program)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.