And the Winner Is ... Houston Wins the First Urban Education Prize for Having Clear Goals and Demonstrating Dramatic Student Achievement

By Pascopella, Angela | District Administration, November 2002 | Go to article overview

And the Winner Is ... Houston Wins the First Urban Education Prize for Having Clear Goals and Demonstrating Dramatic Student Achievement


Pascopella, Angela, District Administration


Houston Independent School District has what it takes to succeed despite large volumes of low-income and at-risk students.

It has clear and specific academic objectives.

It provides resources and support to leaders and professional development to achieve those goals.

And it regularly monitors school and student performance.

So no real wonder that in October Houston was named the country's top performing urban school district and winner of the first inaugural Broad Prize for Urban Education.

The prize was created by The Broad Foundation to recognize urban School districts that make the greatest overall improvement in student achievement as well as close achievement gaps between minorities and whites and high- and low-income students. Houston, which has nearly 206,000 students, was chosen from five urban school district finalists after careful consideration and school site visits by a 10-member selection jury. Initially, the candidate pool included 108 urban districts.

Houston will receive $500,000 for student scholarships to college and other post-secondary training. The four finalists--Atlanta Public Schools, Boston Public Schools, Garden Grove (Calif.) Unified School District, and Long Beach (Calif.) Unified School Distfict--will each receive $125,000 in scholarships.

"Being named one of the best urban school districts in the country by the Broad Foundation is indeed an honor," says Kaye Stripling, Houston's superintendent of schools. "We work hard to serve our students and I sincerely thank the Broad Foundation and the review committee for recognizing that.

"While this is an award given to the district, it is the students who will benefit and that is the way it should be. HISD will remain committed to serving all of our students and it will stop at nothing to make sure they all succeed."

LOOKING FOR COPYCATS

At the announcement ceremony--which included U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige and senators Edward Kennedy, John Edwards and Hillary Clinton--Broad Foundation Founder Eli Broad thanked the bipartisan support from U.S. senators and representatives for their commitment to education.

"Ensuring achievement in America's urban public schools is the most important civil rights issue of the new century," Broad said. "Inner city public school children will realize their college dreams with these scholarships and our country will share in their success and prosperity as a whole."

Along with the scholarships, the five urban districts will be on display during the next year. Their successful instruction and management practices will be shared with educators nationwide so other urban schools can learn from and possibly mimic them.

Shortly after the announcement, President George W. Bush also congratulated students, parents, teachers, administrators and community leaders.

"Despite facing many challenges, HISD has shown all of us how innovative leadership, hard work and high academic standards can help ensure that no child is left behind," Bush said.

Houston, where Paige was superintendent before coming to the Department of Education, won in part because it showed gains in student achievement, particularly in reading and math at all grade levels over the last three years, officials said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

And the Winner Is ... Houston Wins the First Urban Education Prize for Having Clear Goals and Demonstrating Dramatic Student Achievement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.