Persistence Is the Key to Life after Lung Cancer; DETECTING LUNG CANCER EARLY IS VITAL IN AIDING YOUR REHABILITATION SAYS A COVENTRY DAD

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), January 31, 2003 | Go to article overview

Persistence Is the Key to Life after Lung Cancer; DETECTING LUNG CANCER EARLY IS VITAL IN AIDING YOUR REHABILITATION SAYS A COVENTRY DAD


Byline: Karen Hambridge

FOR lung cancer patient Paul Hingley, persistence and a positive attitude paid off in his own personal battle to recover his health. KAREN HAMBRIDGE reports.

PAUL HINGLEY is keeping cheerful despite the turmoil of the last year.

For Paul, a 46-year-old car worker from Henley Green, is among the hundreds of Coventry and Warwickshire men and women treated annually for lung cancer.

In March the top part of his left lung was removed after an X-ray revealed he had a tumour.

Initially when he complained of pains and breathing troubles his GP thought he might have ulcers. But Paul wasn't convinced. And his persistence paid off.

In fact persistence is something Paul cannot stress enough. And with early diagnosis a key element in successful treatment of lung cancer, you can understand why.

"Catching it early is really important," said the father of two. "If you don't feel right or you feel there is something wrong, keep going back to your GP.

"I was getting pains in my stomach and shoulder and was feeling breathless. But my doctor said it was ulcers at first.

"I could have just left it at that but I didn't think it was ulcers because I wasn't having difficulty eating certain types of food.

"So I kept badgering him and I got my chest X-ray."

Paul couldn't have known that the X-ray would lead to more tests and an eventual diagnosis of lung cancer.

It was a scenario which was furthest from his mind.

And when the diagnosis came he was truly shocked.

"I never thought it would be cancer," he said. "I did smoke, about 20 years ago but I haven't smoked since. I used to work on paint-spraying cars so maybe that had something do to with it. I just don't know ... you can't really pinpoint a reason."

Throughout his experience Paul has remained positive and now, more than ever, is looking to the future. …

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