The Right Move: This Entrepreneur Doesn't Regret Leaving the Corporate World. (Making It)

By Brown, Ann | Black Enterprise, March 2003 | Go to article overview

The Right Move: This Entrepreneur Doesn't Regret Leaving the Corporate World. (Making It)


Brown, Ann, Black Enterprise


During his years as head of corporate staffing and relocations for Motorola Inc., Joseph Webb noticed a disturbing trend. He found that many black executives like himself were without mentors or a support system, and that companies were ill equipped to deal with diversity issues. So he decided to do something about it--and make a tidy profit at the same time.

Webb launched The Stump L.L.C. in 1999, a Chicago-based executive search and coaching firm. With four full-time employees and a network of 25 consultants nationwide, the company generated $320,000 in revenue in 2001 and projects at least $600,000 in revenue for 2002. Its clients include AOL Time Warner Baxter Healthcare, and Abbott Laboratories. The company's services include recruiting, consulting, training, and executive coaching. Fees vary based on the service provided; hourly, per session, by project, or percentage-based.

The Stump focuses on four product offerings: assisting organizations with diversity efforts, executive recruiting with a focus on minorities and women, leadership development through executive coaching for individuals or teams, and training and development for organizational readiness and effectiveness. Even the company's name is significant to Webb's vision of assisting executives of color in the corporate world. According to Webb, in many cultures, the tree stump symbolizes a gathering place where people came together to pool resources and share knowledge. …

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The Right Move: This Entrepreneur Doesn't Regret Leaving the Corporate World. (Making It)
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