$10,000 in Total Prizes Will Be Awarded to This Year's Winners of the Gertrude Johnson Williams: Literary Contest: New Writers Have Won More Than $100,000 in Total Prizes in Previous Contests. (Writers Wanted!!!)

Ebony, October 2002 | Go to article overview

$10,000 in Total Prizes Will Be Awarded to This Year's Winners of the Gertrude Johnson Williams: Literary Contest: New Writers Have Won More Than $100,000 in Total Prizes in Previous Contests. (Writers Wanted!!!)


NEW AND EMERGING writers have an opportunity to win prizes totalling $10,000 in the 11th annual EBONY writing contest, which was founded by EBONY Publisher and Editor John H. Johnson in honor of his late mother, Mrs. Gertrude Johnson Williams, and is designed to provide encouragement for previously unpublished writers.

Over the years, winners and runners-up in the EBONY writing contest have gone on to publish books and produce plays, win major literary awards, and to develop screenplays for feature films and television.

In addition to uncovering new writing talent, another purpose of the contest is to raise the level of consciousness and hope of African-American writers and readers. What we seek in this contest, therefore, are stories that inspire rather than depress.

As Publisher Johnson says: "We believe, without apology, that African-American writers should increase the level of hope by showing African-Americans grappling with their fate, defining and redefining the African-American tradition by refusing to give in or give up."

The contest is open to all Americans of African descent who have not previously received money or other financial consideration for writing short stories, novels, plays, television or movie scripts. Contestants should submit original short stories for judging by a panel of editors.

The winning entry will be announced in the March 2003 issue of EBONY, and may be published solely at the discretion of Johnson Publishing Co. The announcement will constitute due notice to all contestants. The deadline for submission of manuscripts is midnight, November 1, 2002.

Contestants will be bound by the following rules and stipulations:

1. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

$10,000 in Total Prizes Will Be Awarded to This Year's Winners of the Gertrude Johnson Williams: Literary Contest: New Writers Have Won More Than $100,000 in Total Prizes in Previous Contests. (Writers Wanted!!!)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.