Four Tiny Scars Uand a Baby! WHAT EXPERIMENTAL SURGERY DID FOR ME

By Gill, Liz | Daily Mail (London), February 25, 2003 | Go to article overview

Four Tiny Scars Uand a Baby! WHAT EXPERIMENTAL SURGERY DID FOR ME


Gill, Liz, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: LIZ GILL

ME AND MY OPERATION

LAPAROSCOPY

WHEN Beverley Arnold had a new laparoscopic, or 'keyhole', procedure to reverse her sterilisation, it was so effective that the 36-year-old former care worker was pregnant within six weeks. Beverley, who has two daughters, 15-year-old Karis and Chanelle, eight, lives in Watton, Norfolk, with her partner John Boswell, 37, a courier. Here, she tells LIZ GILL her story and below, her surgeon explains the technique.

THE PATIENT

WHEN I made the decision to be sterilised, I was only 30. My marriage had become so rocky that having another baby was just not an option.

My GP did warn me the chances of a successful reversal would not be great, but I was adamant. I never imagined I'd meet anyone else.

Then, a couple of years after I'd split up from my husband, I got together with John.

I told him about my operation very early on, and we decided to try for a reversal, although he knew it was possible we might never be able to have children.

We were living in London at the time and I got an appointment at the Royal London Hospital in October 2001.

I was expecting a long wait for the operation, and had investigated having it done privately, but it would have cost between u4,000 and u5,000, so that was out of the question.

But then I was told there was a new technique being performed by a surgeon called Colin Davis.

He wanted to broadcast the operation, via a TV link, to an international conference at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in February of the following year, and wondered if I would be interested in being the patient.

I said yes - I was just glad to have the chance so soon.

We met Mr Davis in January 2002 and he explained what it would involve.

I was a bit nervous the day I went into hospital. I had a general anaesthetic, and when I woke up, my tummy felt a bit sore, but it certainly wasn't agonising, and nothing like the Caesarean I'd had for my first daughter.

I went home the day after the surgery and within three days I felt almost back to normal.

All you can see now are four small scars, two above and two below my navel, which have already faded to almost nothing now.

We'd been told we could make love again whenever I felt ready, so we left it for a couple of weeks for everything to settle down.

The operation initially caused barely a hiccup in my menstrual cycle. But then my second period was ten days late. The only time that had happened before was when I was pregnant, but I couldn't believe that was the case now.

THERE were no shops open as it was the Easter weekend, so I couldn't get a pregnancy testing kit. When I finally did, it was April 1. I kept staring at that blue line telling me it was positive.

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Four Tiny Scars Uand a Baby! WHAT EXPERIMENTAL SURGERY DID FOR ME
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