Church Social Action Ministry Faces Credibility Crisis: Sex Scandals Taint Efforts. (News Analysis)

By Feuerherd, Joe | National Catholic Reporter, February 21, 2003 | Go to article overview

Church Social Action Ministry Faces Credibility Crisis: Sex Scandals Taint Efforts. (News Analysis)


Feuerherd, Joe, National Catholic Reporter


The 500-plus social ministry workers who descended on Washington Feb. 9-12 came to advocate for programs under budgetary assault and to voice opposition to a war many see as inevitable. But first, they had to deal with the elephant in the middle of the hotel ballroom: the clerical sexual abuse scandal.

Bishop Wilton Gregory, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, set the tone at the opening liturgy: "Some may see the voice of bishops as perhaps diminished or compromised, but Our voice and the voice of the entire Catholic community is needed more than ever."

"We all hear rumors," said former Kentucky Catholic Conference director Jane Chiles. "I hear that our traditional partners and coalitions that we have advocated with for decades may be suggesting that we stay home--that our presence may have a spoiling effect upon the work to be done," said Chiles, a member of the review board established by the bishops to deal with scandals.

The social ministers see themselves, with considerable cause, as the good guys. Through advocacy in state capitols and city councils or direct service in soup kitchens and homeless shelters they translate Catholic social teaching into action. Still, like every institution that bears the name "Catholic," they are tainted.

The meeting, therefore, was part strategy session--how best to make their case to the members of Congress--and part pep rally, an effort to bolster the spirits of frontline troops demoralized by a year of unrelenting scandal.

How demoralized?

Over the past year Dan Misleh gave serious thought, he said, to "turning my back on this work." The Sunday night realizations that he was "not looking forward to going to work on Monday" took their toll on the director of diocesan relations at the U.S. bishops' Office of Social Development and World Peace.

The Cleveland diocese, meanwhile, was rocked by the April 2002 suicide of Fr. Don Rooney, a 48-year-old priest accused of sexual abuse. Cleveland resident Mark Falbo of John Carroll University's Center for Community Service said, "We have to come to terms with [the sexual abuse scandals] or it becomes an easy way to disclaim us. …

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Church Social Action Ministry Faces Credibility Crisis: Sex Scandals Taint Efforts. (News Analysis)
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