Senators Press for Biotech Case in WTO; Trade Chief Urges Patience, Says White House Wants Joint Filing against EU

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 6, 2003 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Senators Press for Biotech Case in WTO; Trade Chief Urges Patience, Says White House Wants Joint Filing against EU


Byline: Jeffrey Sparshott, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Senate's top trade legislators yesterday accused the Bush administration of withholding a World Trade Organization case that would open a $300 million market for U.S. biotech crops.

Sen. Charles E. Grassley, Iowa Republican and chairman of Senate Finance Committee, said he is "profoundly disappointed" that the administration has not filed a complaint at the WTO against European Union rules that hinder sales of biotech crops in the 15 EU member nations.

"I simply can't understand the administration's decision to delay bringing a WTO case against the European Union's biotech policies," Mr. Grassley said at a Finance Committee hearing.

Sen. Max Baucus of Montana, the top Democrat on the committee that oversees trade, attacked U.S. Trade Representative Robert B. Zoellick over the administration's inaction. He intimated that policies related to Iraq, where the administration is looking for allies in an effort to disarm the Middle Eastern country, have softened trade policy.

"Who in the administration is saying no [to a WTO case]?" Mr. Baucus demanded.

Mr. Zoellick did not answer directly but said that he was working to create a pro-biotech coalition that would file a joint case at the WTO.

"It shouldn't just be a legal matter. What we have to do is win the debate about biotech in world public opinion," Mr. Zoellick said yesterday before the Finance Committee.

Mr. Zoellick did not elaborate on who could join the coalition. Argentina, Canada, China, South Africa and Australia are the world's biggest biotech producers after the United States.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Senators Press for Biotech Case in WTO; Trade Chief Urges Patience, Says White House Wants Joint Filing against EU
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?