The Return of a Real Hero; Yesterday His Team Arrived Back in Britain in near Disgrace. but We Should Applaud the Truth Behind England's Decision Not to Play in Zimbabwe

By Oborne, Peter | The Evening Standard (London, England), March 7, 2003 | Go to article overview

The Return of a Real Hero; Yesterday His Team Arrived Back in Britain in near Disgrace. but We Should Applaud the Truth Behind England's Decision Not to Play in Zimbabwe


Oborne, Peter, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: PETER OBORNE

NASSER HUSSAIN and his shattered and beleaguered English cricket team arrived back from South Africa yesterday close to disgrace.

By all conventional measures they have had a catastrophic winter: trounced by Australia followed by outright failure in the Cricket World Cup. It was no surprise when Hussain resigned as captain of the national one-day team.

But it is worth pausing for a moment before we condemn Hussain to the dustbin of cricket history and classify him alongside all the failures in that most demanding and thankless of jobs.

For there is a strong case that Hussain is not one of the worst, but actually one of the finest captains England has ever had. For he is the only recent cricket captain of England to have grasped that the job brings not only sporting challenges, but can also make the most intense moral demands.

Many cricketers fail to cope.

Graham Gooch and Mike Gatting let themselves down emphatically when they led their disgraceful "rebel tours" to pre-liberation South Africa, which gave succour to apartheid in its dying years.

They pretended, and this was their shameful error, that cricket could be isolated from the society of which it formed part.

So, last week, did the Australian skipper Ricky Ponting, when he took his team into Zimbabwe. Before the game, I am reliably told, urgent messages were sent asking that the Australians should emulate the example of Zimbabwe players Andy Flower and Henry Olonga and wear black armbands. It would have cost the Aussies nothing to agree, but they ignored the requests.

ONLY the England players had the courage and the humanity to engage with the ghastly humanitarian catastrophe bordering on genocide that is swamping Zimbabwe today. What made the stand made by Nasser Hussain and his players all the more exemplary was that they were so alone. They were not supported by any other team, let alone by the wretched English Cricket Board.

They have received no credit for this because, at the time the English cricket team's concalls-At the time the press was ripe with speculation whether England would go to Zimbabwe or not, and the final decision was not to be made for several days. An agonised Hussain spelt out the consequences.

He told me how pulling out of the Zimbabwe fixture could cost English cricket millions of pounds - u8 million was the figure he cited - and cost a number of his players their last chance of competing at the pinnacle of their sport.

Just as important, they would forfeit four points that could easily lose England the chance of going through to the final stages of the comby Peter Oborne petition - as indeed proved to be the case. He told me that England would not be going.

But he did not once cite personal safety as a reason.

Hussain was speaking to me because he knew that I had recently been travelling in the country, making a Channel 4 documentary about how Robert Mugabe was deliberately withholding food from his own starving people. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Return of a Real Hero; Yesterday His Team Arrived Back in Britain in near Disgrace. but We Should Applaud the Truth Behind England's Decision Not to Play in Zimbabwe
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.