We'll All Be Dying to Save the NHS

By Self, Will | The Evening Standard (London, England), March 7, 2003 | Go to article overview

We'll All Be Dying to Save the NHS


Self, Will, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: WILL SELF

APPARENTLY, for every four ministerial opponents of Alan Milburn's proposed revamping of the NHS there are as many different interpretations. I have no idea whether the opting-out of individual hospitals may, in and of itself, be the death knell of free, on-demand medical treatment, but what is certain is that this latest piece of tinkering will, inevitably, bring with it yet more costly bureaucracy and organisational discombobulation.

Sooner or later we're going to find ourselves with a de facto two-tier service, and then it is only a matter of time before the bottom half falls away to become the limbo of the lost, while the nosecone blasts off into the heavenly orbit of the London Clinic and the Cromwell Hospital.

But it is my view that underlying the crisis in the NHS - which has been with me from the cradle and is likely to see me in my grave - is not a political but a philosophical problem. As medical technology improves and practitioners become the very technocrats of the fleshly, so it becomes possible - given the funds - to keep sicker people alive for longer.

As a society we have a hefty appetite for that pill for every ill; if there's a choice between eschewing or chewing the junk food, most us opt for the latter. Modern urban living with its rush, bustle and mobile phone gabble encourages us to be diseased rather than easy going.

There is an enlightening statistic about healthcare in this country.

Apparently, 90 per cent of the resources expended on the medical treatment of the average Briton are spent during the last six weeks of his or her life. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

We'll All Be Dying to Save the NHS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.