Bush Puts the World on Notice for War with Iraq

By Campbell, Jeremy; Reiss, Charles | The Evening Standard (London, England), March 7, 2003 | Go to article overview

Bush Puts the World on Notice for War with Iraq


Campbell, Jeremy, Reiss, Charles, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: JEREMY CAMPBELL;CHARLES REISS

GEORGE BUSH today readied his people for imminent war on Iraq and confronted the UN, telling his critics it was time to "show their cards".

The President promised he would try one more time to win backing from the Security Council for military action.

But in a threat that heralds a crisis for Tony Blair, he warned: "If we need to act, we will act, and we really don't need the UN's approval to do so.

When it comes to our security, we really don't need anybody's permission."

The declaration, in a presidential press conference on primetime US television, was the clearest signal yet that, though Mr Bush maintained the final, formal decision had not yet been taken, conflict is inevitable and only days away.

However, new problems loomed for America, Britain and their allies as the UN chief weapons inspector, Hans Blix, prepared to announce fresh evidence that the Iraqi regime is co-operating.

The latest report from Dr Blix, widely trailed in advance, will point to the recent moves, including the destruction of a number of long-range Al-Samoud missiles and a private interview with scientists, as evidence of Iraqi co-operation.

At the same time the inspectors were unveiling a 170-page report throwing huge doubt on Saddam's claim that Iraq has destroyed chemical and biological weapons and scrapped its nuclear weapons programme.

The report was seized on by Britain and others as a "shocking indictment" of Iraq's failure to comply with repeated UN demands to remove all its weapons of mass destruction.

Mr Blair's official spokesman said: "Where is the hardware? Where are the documents showing what has happened to the hardware? Where is the anthrax?

Where is the sarin?

Where is the mustard gas? Where is the botulinum? Where are the shells, the Scud warheads, the spray tanks, the chemical and biological weapon bombs, the VX?"

Downing Street said all were still unaccounted for. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bush Puts the World on Notice for War with Iraq
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.