London's Economic Strength-A Round Table Discussion

New Statesman (1996), March 3, 2003 | Go to article overview

London's Economic Strength-A Round Table Discussion


5 February 2003

Round table participants

ED BALLS

Ed Balls is chief economic adviser to the Treasury and one of the main architects of the government's regional economic development strategy. He is a member of the Treasury management board and chairman of the International Monetary Fund's deputies' committee.

KEN BODFISH

Ken Bodfish is deputy chairman of the South-east of England Development Agency and Labour leader of Brighton and Hove Council, where he is also executive member for regeneration partnership. He chairs the UK delegation to the European Union's Committee of the Regions and the Local Government Association's European and International Executive.

MICK CONNOLLY

Mick Connolly is regional secretary of the Southern and Eastern TUC. He is a member of the West London Learning and Skills Council and sits on the boards of the London Development Agency, Capital Quality Ltd and the East of England Inward Investment Agency.

TOM FLEMING

Tom Fleming is development officer at the Cultural Industries Development Agency. The organisation supports the growth of culturally diverse and sustainable creative industries through tourism, information communications technology and education.

WARREN HATTER

Warren Hatter is head of research at the New Local Government Network. This is an independent think-tank seeking to transform public services, revitalise local political leadership and empower local communities.

MARK HEPWORTH

Mark Hepworth is director of the Local Futures Group, a research and strategy consultancy that provides a geographical perspective on economic and social change, with a focus on public policy and corporate strategies. He is also a visiting professor at Birkbeck College, University of London.

NIGEL HUGILL

Nigel Hugill is managing director of Chelsfield plc, an urban property development company working with, for example, London Underground and British Waterways. He is a member of the advisory group to the Bartlett School of Planning at University College London and a trustee of the Architecture Foundation.

MICHAEL KEITH

Michael Keith is the head of the Centre for Urban and Community Research at Goldsmiths College, University of London. His research areas are urban policy, race and racism, and policing. He is a Labour councillor in the London borough of Tower Hamlets.

PETER REID

Peter Reid is chief executive of the London Technology Network, a partnership between the London Business School and University College London, and head of the Centre for Scientific Enterprise. The network seeks to connect the business community with London's science and technology researchers and educators.

ANNE SEEX

Anne Seex is chief executive of Norwich City Council, responsible for the city's services through the corporate management team, covering organisational development, spatial planning, housing and community services.

DAVID WALKER (chair)

David Walker is a senior journalist with the Guardian, a regular presenter of BBC Radio 4's Analysis programme and a columnist on Housing Today magazine. He is a non-executive director of Places for People Group and a trustee of the National Centre for Social Research.

JOHN WALKER

John Walker is chief executive of the British Urban Regeneration Association, an independent organisation representing the private, public and community sectors. He is an adviser to the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister.

MICHAEL WARD

Michael Ward is the chief executive of the London Development Agency. He was previously at the Centre for Local Economic Strategies in Manchester.

Also in attendance: Ros Dunn, HM Treasury

DAVID WALKER: I got a handout the other day from Campaign for Yorkshire. It said the case for elected regional assemblies was based on Yorkshire's "prospect of addressing the serious and unacceptable disparity in economic prosperity where GDP per head is currently 48 per cent higher in London and 32 per cent higher in the South-east than in Yorkshire". …

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