Look out, Japan

By Russell, Mark | Newsweek International, March 17, 2003 | Go to article overview

Look out, Japan


Russell, Mark, Newsweek International


When "Wonderful Days" opens next month, it will be the most expensive movie ever made in South Korea. Costing $15 million, the film got its start five years ago, when Kim Moon Saeng, a director of animated commercials, showed his script about environmental apocalypse to producer Kay Hwang, who is also his wife. At first the pair envisioned the futuristic tale as a live-action thriller. But as they hashed out the narrative, sharpening its depiction of a cruel world flooded by global warming, they decided the material was better suited to animation. That choice could soon change the face of Korean cinema.

Technically, at least, "Wonderful Days" delivers quality on a par with the best animation Japan or Hollywood can produce. The film combines huge sets--including 40-foot-long battleship wrecks--with cartoons, computer-generated 3-D images and real-world motion pictures. The melange of technologies overlap to create eerie, provocative images with a depth unrivaled in digital film. "I try to communicate simple truth, the value of humanity, through new technological visuals," Kim says.

The project represents a huge leap for South Korea. For decades, the country served as the sweatshop for the animation industry, supplying artists to fill in cels and colorize backgrounds for U.S. productions like "Batman," "Rugrats" and "The Simpsons." At their peak, Korean animators took in one third of the world's low-end animation subcontracts. In recent years, however, increased competition from less developed Asian nations has cut into that business, spurring Korea to build up its own industry or risk being left behind. "It's about going from 'The Simpsons' to 'Antz'," says Rhee Suk-hun, an official at the Korea Culture and Contents Agency, which provided funding for "Wonderful Days." That kind of government support--combined with cheap labor--have enabled Lee and Hwang to produce the movie for about one fifth of what it would cost at a big Western studio. If they can make hit movies and match Pixar's quality at a fraction of the price, Korea is poised to become a major player in the global animation market. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Look out, Japan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.