Feminists Abandon Iraqi Women

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 16, 2003 | Go to article overview

Feminists Abandon Iraqi Women


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

On Saturday, March 8, feminists gathered in front of the White House to protest military action against Saddam Hussein. The protest was called "Code Pink: Women's Pre-Emptive Strike for Peace." On the other side of the world, Iraqi women are denied the most basic rights and freedoms. Iraqi women live in fear knowing Iraqi law freely allows male relatives to murder them in the name of honor.

In Iraqi prisons, women are raped and tortured for being related to Iraqi opposition activists. Videotapes of the acts are sent to the families.

Despite obvious human-rights violations and limits on freedom, feminists, led by the National Organization for Women, ignore Saddam Hussein's reprehensible treatment of women. Instead feminists talk about America's "tyrants" and the threat of "tyranny in our homes, our workplaces and our schools."

Meanwhile, Iraqi women are no longer allowed to work outside the home.

Once again radical feminists are witness to a legitimate case of tyranny and violence against women, but they would rather remain steadfastly against any policies or actions taken by America and the Bush administration. NOW President Kim Gandy stated, "The real terrorism is the Bush administration's disregard for international law and destruction of civil liberties at home. This has become an issue of one dictator vs. another."

Feminists are more comfortable with allowing Iraqi women to endure torture than supporting the Bush administration. For example, a report by Amnesty International documented the beheading of 50 young women in Baghdad. The report also said, "The heads of these women were hung on the doors of their houses for a few days." Saddam's son Uday led the group of men who beheaded the women and terrorized their families.

The U.S. State Department reports that human-rights organizations receive continuous testimony on the psychological trauma women have suffered after being tortured and raped by Iraqi military personnel.

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