Marketing Education Division. (Meet ACTE Divisions & Regions)

By Norwood, Marcella | Techniques, March 2003 | Go to article overview

Marketing Education Division. (Meet ACTE Divisions & Regions)


Norwood, Marcella, Techniques


Marketing education prepares young people to assume the responsibility of being effective and thoughtful citizens and develops skilled individuals who are crucial to a healthy and viable democracy. Marketing education programs must meet the needs of a changing global economic environment with quality programs. Marketing educators are meeting these needs in classrooms at the high school, community college, technical college, and university levels. Marketing educators are a vital part of the economy, and the young people who pass through our doors on the way to careers and further education have an opportunity to benefit from our support and input.

This year is a critical year for the Marketing Education Division of ACTE. The division is looking for more than a few good members! Division membership is lagging behind for this year by 200 members. The membership requirement to continue as a division and have representation on the Board of Directors as well as division programming and funding is 1,200 members. In October 2002, the division had 1,074 members. Therefore, if you know of marketing educators who have not renewed their membership or who are new to the field, please ask them for their support as members. Individuals who have been marketing educators and have moved to other divisions may also support marketing education by adding an additional division for $10.

Career and technology teachers benefit from their participation in many ways, including Techniques magazine, opportunities to interact with people who are able to support efforts of marketing education teachers to do an excellent job in the classroom, and lobbying activities in Congress that benefit individual teachers. Those lobbying efforts provide salaries for many teachers throughout the United States in marketing education and other CTE classrooms.

There are several opportunities for participation in leadership roles within the division. All marketing educators, including classroom teachers, teacher educators, supervisors and state staff, are welcome on these committees. …

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Marketing Education Division. (Meet ACTE Divisions & Regions)
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