Building Cities for Peace: How an Antiwar Initiative Is Turning into a Way to Strengthen Democracy

By Nichols, John | The Nation, March 31, 2003 | Go to article overview

Building Cities for Peace: How an Antiwar Initiative Is Turning into a Way to Strengthen Democracy


Nichols, John, The Nation


Amy Lake and 159 other residents of Salisbury, Connecticut, trudged through snow and freezing cold to gather at the Town Hall on the night of January 17. There, Lake read a resolution declaring that the townspeople of Salisbury oppose a pre-emptive military action against Iraq and calling on President Bush and Congress to work with the United Nations for peace.

When the 44-year-old social studies teacher finished, someone made a motion to approve the resolution and just about everyone in the hall yelled "Second!" Then, by a vote of 156 to 4, this rural, Republican-leaning community became a "City for Peace." First Selectman Val Bernardoni wrote a note to President Bush urging him "to lead the world community toward universal understanding and good will," television stations broadcast the news, and folks from across the state started calling Lake to ask how their towns could do the same. "Our intent was to make some noise, to really get people talking, to educate people," says Lake. "The Cities for Peace movement has turned out to be the perfect vehicle. I think we all felt as if we had reclaimed our citizenship."

Lake's enthusiasm is matched by that of activists in communities across the United States. Over the past five months, jurisdictions that are home to more than 30 million Americans have passed 140 antiwar resolutions--forming what Telluride, Colorado, Council member John Steel described at a February 13 rally of Cities for Peace activists outside the White House as "the collective conscience of our country." Says John Cavanagh, the director of the Washington-based Institute for Policy Studies (IPS), which has played a critical role in promoting the Cities for Peace movement, "What we are witnessing is a remarkable grassroots movement that has had a role in transforming the debate about the war and that, I think, offers us a new model for educating and organizing that gives people at the grassroots a real voice in debates about national and international issues."

In Cavanagh's view, that model has enormous potential on a number of fronts. He foresees the possibility of networks of local officials who could "think globally, act locally," and who could work with organizers and activists across the country to put neglected issues on the national radar. Ultimately, says Democratic Representative Jan Schakowsky of Illinois, one of the most enthusiastic backers of the Cities for Peace push, these networks could become vehicles for pressuring Democrats in Congress--and perhaps even some Republicans--to weigh in on issues that they are now too politically cautious to address. "We could use that pressure," says Schakowsky, who gets no argument from local officials who have backed Cities for Peace resolutions. As Los Angeles City Council member Janice Hahn said when she announced she would vote for that city's antiwar resolution, "We're debating this issue because those we have elected to debate this issue [in Congress] have abdicated."

Anger at that abdication is at the root of the Cities for Peace movement, which began around the time of last fall's Congressional vote to cede authority on decisions regarding Iraq to Bush. "A lot of folks decided that if the people at the federal level were refusing to listen, they would start talking to City Hall," says Karen Dolan, a fellow at IPS, which has established a Cities for Peace clearinghouse. The first communities to take a stand--places like Santa Cruz and Sebastopol, in California, and Tompkins County, New York, did not pass peace resolutions as part of a planned protest. But as word spread that antiwar resolutions were being enacted, college towns that have long been centers of antiwar activism--Berkeley and Ann Arbor, Madison and Amherst, Oberlin and Ithaca--acted. Then came the big cities: Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Cleveland, Denver, Detroit, Los Angeles, Milwaukee, Newark, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Paul, San Francisco and Seattle. …

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