Black College Queens 2003


LOOK at them. From the crowns of their heads to the tips of their feet, they are trendsetters and leaders of tomorrow. They are the Black Queens of 2003, and they have shown that with beauty comes grace, style, intelligence, and a desire to make life better for all.

Beginning with the middle of the alphabet, the 2003 list includes queens from historically Black colleges and universities, and Black queens from traditionally White institutions of higher education.

Cancer researchers, teachers, doctors, lawyers, entertainers and caretakers--they are the future.

Miss Harris-Stowe State College is ClauDean Chinaka Kizart, an elementary education/ special education major from Chicago. She appears to earn a Ph.D. in education, and enjoys African dance and sewing.

Tiffany Chari Gainer, a junior from Buffalo, N.Y., is Miss Howard University. A political science major, she plans to pursue a career in corporate law, and enjoys reading Black-authored novels.

Miss Morehouse College is Jennifer S. Hembrick, a senior at Spelman College and a native of Richmond, Va. A senior majoring in psychology/pre-medicine, she plans to open an urban family clinic that serves low-income families.

Lauren M. Scott of Cincinnati is Miss Johnson C. Smith University. The senior business administration major intends to earn her master's degree in business administration and is a member of the tennis team.

Darcie A. Chism, a senior from Memphis, Tenn., is Miss Fisk University. She is a psychology/education major who plans to become a principal in her hometown.

Miss Meharry Medical College is Keisha Natasha Blair, of the Bronx, N.Y. She is a third-year medical student who plans to become a pediatrician for the U.S. Navy.

Miss Morris Brown College is Bonnecia Williams, a senior from St. Louis. The music education major is a member of the Student Senate and honor society.

Miss North Carolina Central University is a senior, Candis N. Jones. The Fayetteville, N.C., native is in the honor society and plans to become a teacher and counselor.

Miss Philander Smith College, a senior from El Dorado, Ark., is Taco Williams. A biology/pre-medicine major, she plans to become an oncologist.

Lafay C. Warwick is Miss Miles College. The senior from Talladega, Ala., is a business/marketing major seeking a master's degree in business administration.

Antoinette M. Heyward is Miss Morris College. A native of Ridgeland, S.C., she is a senior majoring in business administration and wants to become a loan officer.

Porsche Vanderhorst is Miss Oakwood College. A native of North Bethesda, Md., she is a junior majoring in English, language arts education and vocal performance.

Nella P. Mupier is Miss Prairie View A&M University. The Bloomington, Ill., native is a senior majoring in psychology. The HIV/AIDS activist hopes to get a Ph.D. in psychology.

Nikeya D. Carter, a senior biology major, is Miss Mississippi Valley State University. A native of Huntsville, Ala., she plans to become a physical therapist and personal trainer.

Miss Norfolk State University is Stephanie N. Lassiter, a sophomore political science major. The Chesapeake, Va., native is a Thurgood Marshall Scholar and an aspiring attorney.

Miss Paine College, Jamey A. Frails, is a junior from Harlem, Ga. An English major who's involved in student government, she plans to become a college professor.

Miss Rust College, LaTonya M. Turner, is a senior from Tchula, Miss. The biology/pre-medicine major and honor society member wants to become a cardiovascular surgeon.

Miss Morgan State University, Nia M. Wilkes, is a senior from Yonkers, N.Y., majoring in elementary education. The aspiring teacher writes poetry and dances for leisure.

Brooke Myatt, a senior from Winston-Salem, N.C., is Miss North Carolina A&T State University.

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